Undisclosed company wins POT stock ticker lottery, says TMX Group

Roughly 40 eligible ballots were submitted to participating exchanges to use ticker name

The POT stock ticker has been allocated by random lottery to a publicly listed company, but Canada’s largest stock exchange operator is not naming the company or the industry of the winner of the coveted symbol.

Roughly 40 eligible ballots were submitted to participating exchanges — the Toronto Stock Exchange, the TSX Venture Exchange, the Canadian Securities Exchange and the Aequitas NEO Exchange — and a currently listed company was selected, the TMX Group said.

However, it would not disclose the name of the company or the industry of the firm which now can use the cannabis-themed ticker.

“The company will be notified by their exchange, it is up to the company to make an announcement,” said Catherine Kee, a spokeswoman for TMX, which operates the Toronto Stock Exchange and the TSX Venture Exchange.

The POT symbol became available after fertilizer Potash Corp. officially merged with Agrium Inc. in early 2018 to become Nutrien Ltd., which now trades under NTR.

The ticker is set to become available for reservation and usage as of Friday, and “significant demand” for the catchy stock symbol prompted the exchanges to allocate the POT ticker via random lottery.

Interested parties had until Jan. 29 to throw their name into the hat. Currently listed firms and companies looking to list were able to enter the lottery, but ETF providers were not eligible, according to a joint notice posted by the exchanges.

READ MORE: Canadian stock exchanges to conduct lottery for ‘POT’ ticker amid high demand

“This was a collaborative process, and as stated in the joint communication issued by Canadian exchanges, ‘exchange traded funds and issuers that do not have an active operating business were not eligible to participate’,” Kee said in an email.

Although the ticker can be used as early as Friday, the winning issuer will have up to 90 days following the lottery to change its symbol to POT.

Extensions beyond 90 days will not be provided, the exchanges said in the joint notice, and if it is not used by then another lottery will be conducted.

The ticker would likely be attractive to a player in the cannabis industry, but the exchanges did not say whether pot companies were among those who expressed interest.

Canopy Growth Corp.’s co-chief executive Bruce Linton said it was eyeing the ticker, not for the licensed producer itself, but one of the various companies it has invested in.

For example, its venture capital arm Canopy Rivers has several invested companies planning to go public, he said.

Canopy had originally wanted the POT ticker for itself, but it was still held by Potash at the time, he said. The Smiths Falls, Ont.-based cannabis producer started trading as CGC but changed the symbol to WEED on the TSX in 2017.

The eye-catching ticker has been useful, Linton said.

“It helped at the right time and the right place, when your ticker was a salacious topic, because it’s ‘weed.’… It’s served its purpose.”

Armina Ligaya, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Proposed Boston Flats Eco-Depot hits rezoning amendment hurdle

TNRD now considering way forward after third reading of bylaw defeated

Conservative candidate Brad Vis speaks at Ashcroft Tiwn Hall

Puts family first, says Conservatives will work for all Canadians

New report on 2017 wildfires calls for better coordination with First Nations

Tsilhqot’in National Government documents 2017 disaster and lists 33 calls to action

In 1968, an Ashcroft Art Show was an idea whose time had come

Local artists got together to form a club in 1967, and a year later a show was born

Soccer week 2: League play gets underway

Warm-up time is over as the teams get down to work

VIDEO: Driver in bizarre hit-and-run at B.C. car dealership turns herself in

Police believe alcohol was a factor in incident causing estimated $15,000 in damages

‘B.C. cannot wait for action’: Top doctor urges province to decriminalize illicit drugs

Dr. Bonnie Henry says current approach in ‘war on drugs’ has criminalized and stigmatized drug users

B.C. woman, 76, challenges alcohol-screening laws after failing to give breath sample

Norma McLeod was unable to provide a sample because of her medical conditions

B.C. youth coach banned amid sexual harassment, bullying scandal: Water Polo Canada

Justin Mitchell can’t take part in Water Polo Canada events or clubs

Wilson-Raybould: Feds want to just ‘manage the problem’ of Indigenous Peoples

Former federal justice minister speaks at First Nations Justice Council meeting in B.C.

Haida youth travels to New York for UN forum on Indigenous issues

Haana Edensaw presented her speech in Xaad Kil, Masset dialect of the Haida language

Female real estate agents warned of suspicious man in Metro Vancouver

The man requests to see homes alone with the female agent, police say

Can you put your phone down for Mother’s Day?

#DiningMode campaign encourages people to leave the phone alone while eating

Horgan heckled as gas prices sit at record high, could go up more

Premier John Horgan blames refiners, not taxes

Most Read