Columnists

Pellet plant recently completed at Terrace’s only sawmill uses waste wood to create a new revenue stream. (Skeena Sawmills)

B.C. VIEWS: Sawmill struggles as NDP boosts northwest log exports

Skeena Sawmills comeback threatened by B.C. government

Pellet plant recently completed at Terrace’s only sawmill uses waste wood to create a new revenue stream. (Skeena Sawmills)
A man looks over a brochures offering various retirement savings options in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

OPINION: Why is the B.C. NDP government abandoning pensioners?

Michael Powell is the president of the Canadian Federation of Pensioners

  • Aug 8, 2019
A man looks over a brochures offering various retirement savings options in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Richard Truscott is the Vice-President, B.C. and Alberta, Canadian Federation of Independent Business (Submitted).

COLUMN: Business owners hand B.C. government another dismal grade, CFIB says

CFIB wants policy makers to take three simple steps in order to improve their grade

  • Aug 6, 2019
Richard Truscott is the Vice-President, B.C. and Alberta, Canadian Federation of Independent Business (Submitted).
The Editor’s Desk: Armchair experts not wanted

The Editor’s Desk: Armchair experts not wanted

In the wake of the disappearance of two teens wanted for murder, lots of people are expert trackers

The Editor’s Desk: Armchair experts not wanted
Burlington Northern Santa Fe train hauls one of many daily loads of thermal coal from Wyoming along White Rock beach, for export to Asia power plants. Shipments through B.C. ports jumped after California, Oregon and Washington stopped shipments from their ports. (Michael Chu/Flickr)

B.C. VIEWS: Politicians grasp at straws, avoid climate policy reality

It doesn’t matter what parties offer in the fall Canadian election

Burlington Northern Santa Fe train hauls one of many daily loads of thermal coal from Wyoming along White Rock beach, for export to Asia power plants. Shipments through B.C. ports jumped after California, Oregon and Washington stopped shipments from their ports. (Michael Chu/Flickr)
The Editor’s Desk: An early start to the silly season

The Editor’s Desk: An early start to the silly season

It looks as if we’re headed for a long August, as the silly season got going early this year

The Editor’s Desk: An early start to the silly season
A souvenir of the Cornwall fire lookout. The lookout survives, despite a threat to dismantle it in 2015, thanks in part to the Journal. Photo: Barbara Roden

The Editor’s Desk: Saving a bit of history

The Journal is proud to have played a part in preserving a piece of local history

A souvenir of the Cornwall fire lookout. The lookout survives, despite a threat to dismantle it in 2015, thanks in part to the Journal. Photo: Barbara Roden
Forests Minister Doug Donaldson announces program to preserve 54 of the largest trees in B.C., Saanich, July 17, 2019. (B.C. government)

B.C. VIEWS: NDP pushes ahead with Crown forest redistribution

This isn’t the time for a radical Indigenous rights agenda

Forests Minister Doug Donaldson announces program to preserve 54 of the largest trees in B.C., Saanich, July 17, 2019. (B.C. government)
The October 1975 issue of Mad Magazine featured the spot-on parody Muddle on the Orient Express, one of hundreds of movie and TV show spoofs the magazine ran in its 67-year history.

The Editor’s Desk: What, me sad?

The announcement that Mad Magazine is shutting down marks the end of an era

The October 1975 issue of Mad Magazine featured the spot-on parody Muddle on the Orient Express, one of hundreds of movie and TV show spoofs the magazine ran in its 67-year history.
B.C.’s first government cannabis store opens in Kamloops, October 2018. The city is getting two more government stores this year. (Black Press files)

B.C. VIEWS: Will the NDP lose money selling marijuana?

Government monopoly sounds great, if you work there

B.C.’s first government cannabis store opens in Kamloops, October 2018. The city is getting two more government stores this year. (Black Press files)
Jock Finlayson, executive vice president and chief policy officer of the Business Council of BC. (Submitted)

COLUMN: B.C. must find new ways to grow economy as housing market unfurls

Jock Finlayson is executive vice president and chief policy officer of the Business Council of BC

  • Jul 12, 2019
Jock Finlayson, executive vice president and chief policy officer of the Business Council of BC. (Submitted)
The Editor’s Desk: Can’t you read the sign?

The Editor’s Desk: Can’t you read the sign?

Pop quiz: If a road sign says STREET CLOSED, do you obey it or do what you want?

The Editor’s Desk: Can’t you read the sign?
Caribou calf in a maternity pen near Revelstoke, to protect it from wolves until it is old enough to survive. (Black Press Media)

GUEST COLUMN: Condemning caribou to extinction in B.C.

Province’s two-year moratorium on new mining, logging not enough

  • Jul 8, 2019
Caribou calf in a maternity pen near Revelstoke, to protect it from wolves until it is old enough to survive. (Black Press Media)
Caribou herds in B.C. are divided into four groups, southern mountain (shown), central mountain, northern mountain and boreal. (Black Press Media)

B.C. VIEWS: Killing B.C. industries won’t save the caribou

Herds dwindling across Canada, with or without logging

Caribou herds in B.C. are divided into four groups, southern mountain (shown), central mountain, northern mountain and boreal. (Black Press Media)
The Editor’s Desk: Hot diggety dog (not)

The Editor’s Desk: Hot diggety dog (not)

Running out of free hot dogs isn’t cause for complaint

The Editor’s Desk: Hot diggety dog (not)
The Editor’s Desk: I’d love to be laughed at

The Editor’s Desk: I’d love to be laughed at

Given the choice of being laughed at or being killed, the answer is a pretty simple one

The Editor’s Desk: I’d love to be laughed at
An old-growth forest clearcut in Schmidt Creek on eastern Vancouver Island in May 2019. (Mark Worthing/Sierra Club BC)

COLUMN: Clearcutting B.C.’s last old-growth leaves all of us poorer, forever

Jens Wieting of Sierra Club BC responds to columns by Tom Fletcher and David Elstone

  • Jun 24, 2019
An old-growth forest clearcut in Schmidt Creek on eastern Vancouver Island in May 2019. (Mark Worthing/Sierra Club BC)
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau leaving the Trans Mountain pipeline’s Indigenous Advisory and Monitoring Committee meeting on the Cheam reserve in Chilliwack on June 5, 2018. (Paul Henderson/ The Progress file)

OPINION: Wading through the PR tsunami post-pipeline approval

Those who hate the pipeline, hate Trudeau’s decision – those who hate Trudeau, still hate him

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau leaving the Trans Mountain pipeline’s Indigenous Advisory and Monitoring Committee meeting on the Cheam reserve in Chilliwack on June 5, 2018. (Paul Henderson/ The Progress file)
The Editor’s Desk: The joy (?) of flying

The Editor’s Desk: The joy (?) of flying

Air travel was once glamorous and enjoyable. What happened?

The Editor’s Desk: The joy (?) of flying
Agriculture Minister Lana Popham visits a Fraser Valley cranberry farm during a provincial tour to begin her new job in the NDP government, October 2017. (B.C. government)

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Agriculture Minister Lana Popham visits a Fraser Valley cranberry farm during a provincial tour to begin her new job in the NDP government, October 2017. (B.C. government)