Cache Creek firefighters are already planning their annual fireworks display, which they are promising to make even bigger than usual this year. (Photo credit: Stock image)

Cache Creek firefighters are already planning their annual fireworks display, which they are promising to make even bigger than usual this year. (Photo credit: Stock image)

Cache Creek firefighters plan bigger, better Halloween fireworks

‘With so much uncertainty in the world it’s nice to know that one community event is staying intact’

Halloween celebrations and activities might look a little different this year, but the Cache Creek Volunteer Fire Department (CCVFD) is going ahead with their annual fireworks display, and is aiming to make 2020’s show even bigger and better than usual.

“Typically our fireworks display is to the tune of about $3,000 to $4,000,” says Damian Couture, 1st Assistant Chief of the CCVFD, and secretary of the Cache Creek Volunteer Fire Fighters Association. “We as a society throw money in, and we look for support from the community.

“This year, because of COVID-19 and everything else going on, we’ve set a higher target for ourselves and upped [the budget] to $6,000 to $7,000. We don’t know if kids can trick-or-treat this year, so we want to almost double it in hopes of providing something to the community. Lots of people are changing their way of life but we want to give people something they’ve seen for years, and make it better.”

The Society could not hold their annual Easter Egg hunt this spring, and Couture says that the Halloween fireworks — an annual tradition for more than 30 years — is a way of showing they’re still here. He adds that at this point nobody know what Halloween 2020 will look like.

“Everyone is focused on what school will look like. I’m hearing some people say ‘No, I’m not letting my kids go trick or treating’ and others are saying yes, and some people are saying they won’t have candy this year.”

The display takes place on the hill above the Sunset Motel on Collins Road, and Couture says the firefighters usually get there around 7 p.m., but the time of this year’s fireworks has yet to be determined.

“Traditionally there’s a costume contest inside the Community Hall and we wait until they finish their judging. They bring people out when they’re finished and signal to us and we start, but this year we don’t think the costume contest will happen, at least not in the same way.”

He says that the display can be watched from a number of places around Cache Creek.

“People park along Stage Road, at the Community Hall, and on any of the side streets. The whole community is where you can be. If you can see the hill you’ll get a good view. Usually the very good spots for parking and viewing fill up fast. We can see the lights [of the cars] start to pull up and park in the really nice spots around 7 or 7:15 p.m. People usually find a good spot, park, bring something to eat and drink, and wait for up to an hour.”

Couture notes that the beauty of fireworks is that you don’t have to be standing right beside someone to enjoy them.

“You can sit in your car and watch, or stand outside your car. That’s what people traditionally do, so you can have a community event but be separate from each other.

“With so much uncertainty in the world today it’s nice to know that one community event is staying intact.”

The Society and its members provide much of the funding, and Couture says that the Ashcroft Volunteer Fire Department usually comes out to help. A letter has been sent to local businesses and organizations asking for financial assistance for this year’s fireworks; anyone (including individuals) who would like to contribute can contact the Society at (250) 457-9967, or by mail at P.O. Box 73, Cache Creek, B.C. V0K 1H0.



editorial@accjournal.ca

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