From the archives: In 1971, Bonaparte First Nation elects its first female chief

In October 1971, Ann Zabotel (pictured) was elected the first female chief of Bonaparte First Nation. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)In October 1971, Ann Zabotel (pictured) was elected the first female chief of Bonaparte First Nation. (Photo credit: Journal archives)
‘Arena Donation from Inland Natural Gas’ (Oct. 21, 1971): ‘Norm Arnott, Manager of Inland Inland Natural Gas for Ashcroft-Cache Creek is presenting a cheque for $250 to Chairman Doug Bain, for Ashcroft-Cache Creek Skating Arena.’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)‘Arena Donation from Inland Natural Gas’ (Oct. 21, 1971): ‘Norm Arnott, Manager of Inland Inland Natural Gas for Ashcroft-Cache Creek is presenting a cheque for $250 to Chairman Doug Bain, for Ashcroft-Cache Creek Skating Arena.’ (Photo credit: Journal archives)
‘CBC’s Wayne & Shuster’ (Oct. 26, 1946): ‘Canada’s new comedy headliners are Johnny Wayne and Frank Shuster, left and right above, whose Thursday evening CBC broadcast goes nationwide on the Trans-Canada network. It’s heard in this province at 6:30 p.m. Pacific time.’ The tape across Wayne’s face appears to be part of the original photograph, and deliberate on the part of the comedians. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)‘CBC’s Wayne & Shuster’ (Oct. 26, 1946): ‘Canada’s new comedy headliners are Johnny Wayne and Frank Shuster, left and right above, whose Thursday evening CBC broadcast goes nationwide on the Trans-Canada network. It’s heard in this province at 6:30 p.m. Pacific time.’ The tape across Wayne’s face appears to be part of the original photograph, and deliberate on the part of the comedians. (Photo credit: Journal archives)

125 YEARS AGO: OCT. 24 and 31, 1896

Lytton News: The Globe hotel at Lytton, under the management of A.F. Hautier, is again becoming a popular resort, notwithstanding the late fire which totally destroyed the old building. It is now opposite the old place.

Sporting News: On Tuesday afternoon, a very interesting dog fight took place on Main street. At the start there were about four people on the corner, and near the finish the street was crowded ten-deep with rubbernecks. The fight was a draw, both dogs getting their just dues.

The La Cigale Comedy: It is seldom that Ashcroft is visited by an amateur comedy company of such merit as that which played in the town hall on Thursday evening under the title of La Cigale Comedy company. The above company is organized by amateurs consisting of fifteen people all being residents of Calgary, N.W.T., and have a special car of their own which is sidetracked at whatever place they wish to play… The hall was crowded and the audience was not long in finding out that they were getting their money’s worth.

Courtroom News: A man was sentenced to $50 and costs or two months imprisonment Thursday evening for assaulting a couple of ladies on the street. The ladies were going home from prayer-meeting when a drunken man tried to embrace them. Some of the man’s friends took up a collection Friday and freed him. The prisoner got off pretty lightly and if any more such occurrences happen they should get the full extent of the law.

100 YEARS AGO: OCT. 21 and 28, 1921

Ashcroft Race Meet: Fair Weather Conditions and Enthusiastic Management Contribute to Success of Local Sports: Under fair weather conditions, the local sports of Thursday and Friday of last week took place as advertised and arranged. Although the typical south wind with the usual quota of sand and dust was somewhat annoying during both afternoons, the enthusiasm and cheerfulness of those who had charge of the various branches in connection with the races assured the success which was ultimately reached; and the forenoons called for no improvements in weather conditions. The program was so long and complete that it was found necessary to extend the time one day longer, and the greater part of Saturday was devoted to completing the unfinished list and a few final details. The patronage from outside points as well as locally could scarcely have been more general and representative; and Indians were in attendance from far and near throughout the interior. The entire net proceeds of the race meet will be placed to the credit of the Lady Minto Hospital, Ashcroft.

Seaplane Makes Forced Landing: A forced landing on the Fraser river just above Hell’s Gate featured the return trip of Major McLaurin from Kamloops on Friday afternoon. [He] had spent the greater part of a week in the Kamloops area … but on the return flight the seaplane ran foul of extremely blustering conditions, with the result that the pilot had to lay over for several hours before continuing the journey. Some difficulty was experienced by Major McLaurin and the engineer with him in getting away from their position on the Fraser river after the forced landing. The Fraser is none too wide at the point where the landing was made, but the machine got off again without any damage.

Local Liquor Store Robbed: Thieves Break into Government store and appropriate two cases of Booze: Thieves broke into the local government liquor store some time during Monday night gaining entrance through a front window, the two lights of which had been broken; and so far as the vendor is able to ascertain, at least several bottles and two cases of “booze” were stolen. It is thought, however, that a large quantity has been taken. An impression was created that the robbers came from some outside point, carrying away the booty in a truck or motor car. There is much local excitement over the daring robbery. The police are working on the case, but so far no clue has been found that may lead to the arrest or capture of the robbers. Once case of the stolen property was found on Tuesday forenoon under the warehouse of a local concern, having been cached there by the robber. Since this find there is much speculations as to whether the thief may not belong to Ashcroft.

Editorial Comment: Liquor Store Robbery: It is not a matter to be wondered at that the local liquor store has been broken into and a quantity of stock taken away; it is rather a matter of wonder that the crime was not committed sooner. Nothing short of a miniature fortress would be a guarantee against robbery of a stock of goods of this class… In the Ashcroft store there are several large unprotected windows. One of these was broken a few nights ago. When one considers the opportunity that has been offered one does not wonder at the advantage that has been taken. The same thing will happen again if the stock of liquor is not protected by better fortification.

Dance At Walhachin: There will be a big dance in Walhachin on Saturday, Nov. 5 under the auspices of the Walhachin Apple Packers Association. The Ashcroft Orchestra will be in attendance and the lovely hall will be looking its best. A large crowd from Ashcroft is expected and the Walhachin ladies have kindly consented to accommodate any who contemplate staying over night. Dancing will commence at 9 p.m. and will continue till 3 a.m. Ladies will be admitted free while gents will be charged $2. This is the big dance of the season, and Walhachin is preparing to handle a capacity house. Refreshments will be served free of charge.

Road Rule To Change 6 A.M.: Change in the rule of the road from left to right on the lower mainland and on Vancouver Island will take place at 6 a.m. on January 1, 1922. Official word to this effect was brought to a meeting of the Vancouver Automobile Club rule of the road committee recently. It was originally intended to bring the change into effect at midnight on New Year’s Eve. The Vancouver Automobile Club protested against this, and the hour has been changed to 6 a.m. on January 1.

75 YEARS AGO: OCT. 19 and 26, 1946

Ashcroft Aquatic Club: Progress is being made in connection with a suitable pool site, and negotiations are under way in efforts to acquire a location below the bridge on what is known as the Barnes Estate.

New Modern Road Nearly Completed: Work that has been going on during the past two seasons from the Ashcroft Manor to Cache Creek is completed behind Elephant mountain and all but hard surfacing done from Boston flat to Cache Creek. One could not realize the crookedness of the old Cariboo “trail” until the new had taken the place of the old. The Cache Creek hill has practically been eliminated. This hill was a worry in the early days of the horseless carriage, and was a sort of efficient test for motorists coming to Ashcroft. “If you can make Cache Creek hill ‘on high’ you are ‘jake’,” they used to say. Of course in late years all cars “walked” up easily on high. However, at the foot of the Cache Creek hill the new survey crosses the Bonaparte, runs along the river to the Collins Lodge, recrosses near where the historic Cache Creek boarding school once stood and meets the old road near the gate to the Parke’s ranch — at least so we understand. Other Cariboo road relocation work is going on from about the 59 to the 83 mile stopping places. Surveys were made there some years ago and paths cut through the green timbers, but actual grading did not take place until this year. The old road had many twists and turns, hills and hollows, but the new is following the shortest distance between two given points, if not the path of least resistance as was followed by the old road builders, and will reduce the mileage considerably. All new road work is being done with an eye to the future.

The Future Of Ashcroft: The road work during the past two seasons behind Elephant mountain to Boston flat and from the flat to Cache Creek is a sample of road construction with foresight on the part of the provincial government: it is built with an eye to the future — a prophecy of things to come that will not only benefit the interior but the province as a whole. The new highway has obliterated much of the old historic Cariboo “trail”, but sections still remain to tell of bygone pioneering days, and such remnants will no doubt be seen for many years to come to recall those famous old times. Although, however, Ashcroft has been injured to some extent commercially so far as the tourist patronage is concerned by the new road, it should be remembered that the improvement to our highway system was inevitable, and has been anticipated by the business men and others of the town for many years since the possibility of an Alaska and a trans-Canada highway first became of public concern. Nevertheless, although the new road development may injure Ashcroft in a number of ways, it must be remembered that “When yae door sneaks anither opens,” as they say in Scotland, and Ashcroft must look to other irons it has in the fire… We must insist that the cut-off from the Manor on the main road must be shortened, widened, and hard surfaced in the immediate future, so that it will encourage the tourist to come this way and increase our present volume of business. A good road heading in and out of Ashcroft would make it more optional to the tourist which route was chosen.

50 YEARS AGO: Oct. 21 and 28, 1971

First Lady Chief: Mrs. Ann Zabotel was elected the new chief of the Bonaparte Village, and the two reserves at Hat Creek on Thursday, Oct. 14. Ann has been a councillor for the band for many years and has a wide field of experience. She is the first lady to be elected a chief in the area. Other candidates were Roy and Archie Antoine.

School Crest Design Contest: The high school recently ran an intramural house contest to get a name for its school teams and a crest to be used on school clothing. Over 70 entries were received and of these the top ten were give points. House 1 picked up 27 of a possible 55 points. Mike Booth of House 1 came up with the winning design and name “The Golden Rams”.

Village Of Cache Creek: Alderman Souster drew Council’s attention to the various changes in the placing of speed zones at the south entrance to Cache Creek and noted that there had been an accident as a result of these changes. Since there are plans for placing deceleration zones on the east approach to Cache Creek, the Alderman trusted that the situation would not be repeated. It was noted, however, that there was a great improvement in traffic deceleration on the south approach since the Department of Highways placed the signs in the final positions.

Auxiliaries Visit: On Saturday afternoon sixty members of the Ladies Auxiliary to Lady Minto Hospital of Clinton, Cache Creek, and Ashcroft areas were taken on a conducted tour of the new building in North Ashcroft. It is a fireproof building, spacious and modern in every detail. In fact roaming through it makes one wonder where the matron is going to find her staff in this new hospital, after practically tripping over them at present. One would certainly enjoy their convalescent period here with the lovely view from the south windows.

Less Forest Fires This Year: There were 2,898 fires during the year compared with the record of 4,003 created in 1970. By far the biggest in terms of area burned was the TEE fire which spread over 350,000 acres [141,639 hectares] near Fort Nelson. Others such as the Sue and Lill fires which seriously threatened the towns of Donald and Lillooet respectively will not be forgotten quickly. The cost of fighting the fires rose to a new estimated high of $9,752,000. Total estimated area burned is 787,000 acres [318,487 hectares] . Although not a record, it will be above the average of 263,437 acres [106,609 hectares] for the previous ten years. [In 2021, 1,584 fires in B.C. destroyed 868,604 hectares; firefighting costs have been estimated at $565 million].



editorial@accjournal.ca

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