In 1971, a big change is announced for B.C. driver’s licences

Sept. 30, 1971: ‘Barb Shaw Receives 13 Year Badge: Commissioner Mrs. Vernon, left, is here placing a 13 year badge on Barb Shaw at the Brownie, Girl Guide and Ranger banquet at Cache Creek. Barb received many appreciative words for her many hours of time put in for the group.’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)Sept. 30, 1971: ‘Barb Shaw Receives 13 Year Badge: Commissioner Mrs. Vernon, left, is here placing a 13 year badge on Barb Shaw at the Brownie, Girl Guide and Ranger banquet at Cache Creek. Barb received many appreciative words for her many hours of time put in for the group.’ (Photo credit: Journal archives)
As this cartoon in the Ashcroft <em>Journal</em> on Sept. 23, 1921 shows, high beef prices for consumers were as much an issue then as now. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)As this cartoon in the Ashcroft Journal on Sept. 23, 1921 shows, high beef prices for consumers were as much an issue then as now. (Photo credit: Journal archives)
An ad in the Ashcroft <em>Journal</em> on Sept. 28, 1946 promises that travel will be fun again after World War II. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)An ad in the Ashcroft Journal on Sept. 28, 1946 promises that travel will be fun again after World War II. (Photo credit: Journal archives)

125 YEARS AGO: SEPT. 26 and OCT. 3, 1896

NINTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION OF THE INLAND AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION: The ninth annual Exhibition was held Thursday and Friday at Ashcroft. The attendance was not as large as of former years, although there was a fairly good turnout. Several of the usual largest exhibitors were compelled to leave their exhibits at home, on account of irregular running of the trains, the operators strike having tied up the road as far as freight trains are concerned. Where the people of this vicinity excelled was in the field and garden fruit exhibits which would compare with almost any part of the world, and does great credit to the enterprising farmers in this vicinity. The fancy and crayon work was good and had quite a number of competitors. The hall was very tastefully arranged, several ladies and gentlemen devoting their time Wednesday and Thursday morning arranging the exhibits.

CLINTON APPLES: F. Soues, government agent, took first prize for crab apples [at the Exhibition]. The apples were grown at Clinton, 2,960 feet above sea level, and claimed to be the highest point in the province at which apples have been grown.

CHINESE CELEBRATION: The residents of China town celebrated for three days and nights this week, going through some of their religious ceremonies. It sounded all right in the day time to the white residents of Ashcroft, but when they were rudely awakened from a sound slumber at five o’clock in the morning a different kind of religious ceremony was quietly held with emphasis.

NEW PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS: The interesting ceremony of laying the last stone in the construction of British Columbia’s new parliament buildings, was performed Saturday, Sept. 19 by Premier Turner. The buildings which will be completed within six months, are regarded as an architectural triumph by all who have seen them. The cost will exceed $1,000,000.

100 YEARS AGO: SEPT. 23 and 30, 1921

IMPROVEMENT TO ROADS IS ASKED IN THE INTERIOR: Canon J. Hinchcliffe, Conservative member for Victoria in the provincial legislature, was a visitor in the city yesterday. He has just returned from a trip through the Cariboo, [and] reports a general demand for road improvement throughout the interior districts, the people up there being very critical of the attitude of the present government in the matter of ignoring the country districts.

DEWDNEY TRAIL ILLOGICAL: It will come as a surprise, and a somewhat painful one, to those who have been so earnestly canvassing for the Fraser Valley route in the trans-provincial highway, that Dr. King, minister of public works, has expressed himself so highly in favour of the old Dewdney trail. Dr. King climbed the summit of the trail at Allison Pass and camped there. “No snow was encountered,” said the minister, “and the party had a most enjoyable time.” As a summer jaunt no doubt the trip is ideal, but to plant part of the interprovincial highway at 5,800 feet is not feasible, and Dr. King must surely know this well. It is so much the reverse of an all-the-year route that for nine months the road would be impassable.

COWS ON ROAD: “The only pasture lands for cattle now, seems to be on the Cariboo road,” says a party who had the misfortune to collide with a cow, while joy riding.

75 YEARS AGO: SEPT. 21 and 28, 1946

JOINT MEETING FOR HOSPITAL HELD: At the special meeting of the Council of Ashcroft and District Board of Trade held Thursday, to discuss the proposed campaign to raise funds for the hospital addition … an outline for the proposed new wing was given and this included public wards, for both men and women, semi-private wards and private wards, totalling thirty beds. The new building will be of fire-proof construction with wide hallways. Many other modern conveniences are to be installed. Summing up the present hospital, which was built in 1912, it was pointed out that it was necessary to build an addition, not only for the increasing number of patients, but also to the fact that existing facilities were too crowded.

NEW ROAD: The road behind Elephant Mountain [present-day Highway 1] is now open for traffic, having been flushcoated. The contractors made a splendid job of it, and are now concentrating on the Cache Creek hill. The laying of hardsurface on Ashcroft streets is progressing. The contractors will have completed their job this weekend and is a wonderful improvement. Joe Bell Harvey is busy now putting the finishing touches to the edges and corners. The hard surface has been laid the full width of the streets, three inches deep and should last a lifetime.

HUNTING SEASON: Hunters are reporting fairly good bags of ducks the past week, averaging from one to twenty. Geese are still scarce in these parts, but we hear several have been brought in. Game wardens are checking cars at Cache Creek to see that hunters are keeping within the law and game regulations.

50 YEARS AGO: SEPT. 23 and 30, 1971

NEW DRIVERS LICENCE TO HAVE YOUR PICTURE: Commencing April 1st, 1972, a new system of issuing driver licences will go into effect. Attorney-General Peterson in announcing the new procedure said “From that date all motorists who present themselves for licence issue will have a head and shoulders colour photograph taken of themselves which will form part of their driver’s licence. The process will noticeably curtail the illegal use by drivers of the licence of someone else as the photograph will provide a positive identification.” In the past the lack of positive identification has [made] it relatively easy for a driver whose licence has been suspended to continue driving and present another person’s licence when asked by a law enforcement officer. Mr. Peterson added “British Columbia is the first province in Canada to adopt this system and it has been found elsewhere, where such licences exist, that in addition to identification for vehicle use, the photo-licence is recognized for check cashing purposes as well as age identification. I am sure British Columbians will welcome this modern approach to licence issuance.”

CLINTON NEWS: Many Clinton residents now have their numbers on their homes. Avenues in the Hugo subdivision are (from the north) Spruce, Fir, and Elm. McDonald Crescent is the street above Robertson’s store from back of the Budy Shop to the Frontier Hotel parking lot. Teal Street is the new name for the street below Kelly Lake Road where the John Booth residence is. Signs with street names are to be erected soon.

ASHCROFT COUNCIL OPPOSES MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION: The Council strongly registered its protest to Prime Minister Trudeau against the recent committee recommendation suggesting the legalization of marijuana and urged all B.C. Municipalities to also voice their protest and further, urge all citizens to do the same.

SURPRISE PARTY: A surprise party was given by the Mother’s Group in honour of Barb Shaw, retiring Guide Leader. Twenty-five women gathered to give thanks to Barb for the great job she’s done in Guide work. A smorgasbord was held and gifts, ashtray and stand, sweater and lingerie, were give in appreciation. Barb also thanked all who helped her while she was Guide Leader.



editorial@accjournal.ca

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