In 1972, Cache Creek council cracks down on water scofflaws

The second Ashcroft school, pictured around 1890. By 1897 the school was felt to be too small for the number of students, and the provincial government was petitioned for funds to add a second room. A new, larger school would not be built until 1899. (Photo credit: Ashcroft Museum and Archives)The second Ashcroft school, pictured around 1890. By 1897 the school was felt to be too small for the number of students, and the provincial government was petitioned for funds to add a second room. A new, larger school would not be built until 1899. (Photo credit: Ashcroft Museum and Archives)
In 1922, Ashcroft’s new school was officially named the Lady Byng School, in honour of the wife of then-Governor General Julian Byng, 1st Viscount Byng of Vimy. Lord and Lady Byng had recently visited Ashcroft, and Lady Byng had been asked if the school could bear her name. (Photo credit: Ashcroft Museum and Archives)In 1922, Ashcroft’s new school was officially named the Lady Byng School, in honour of the wife of then-Governor General Julian Byng, 1st Viscount Byng of Vimy. Lord and Lady Byng had recently visited Ashcroft, and Lady Byng had been asked if the school could bear her name. (Photo credit: Ashcroft Museum and Archives)

125 YEARS AGO: AUG. 14, 1897

The School Building: The secretary of the school board received the following letter this week: “SIR: Having duly inquired into the matter of providing a new school building in Ashcroft, I find that the amount appropriated for this purpose is $700, and that the plans and specifications were prepared accordingly. I am informed that the proposed building will seat comfortably 60 children, which is the limit intended for a single room. I am also informed that your present building affords ample accommodation for over 50 children. Taking into consideration that during the past school year there were only 58 pupils enrolled, and that the average daily attendance maintained was less than 40, it must be apparent that ample accommodation is being provided for the present. Under the foregoing circumstances, the Department is not warranted in giving authority for the appointment of an additional teacher until the attendance at the school has increased to such an extent as to justify such action. I trust that the building will be completed with as little delay as possible.”

The Fall Fair: The Inland Agricultural Association hold their annual fair at Ashcroft on Oct. 12th and 13th. Everyone living in this district should do all that is possible to help and further the interest of this association and at the fall fair this year, let everyone join in and make it one of the best yet held. It can easily be done as all the material is within reach and the exhibits of fruit, vegetables, grain and live stock which have been exhibited at Ashcroft heretofore would equal anything on the continent. It is expected that in connection with the athletic sports a foot ball match between Ashcroft and Clinton will be played, which will be very interesting, as it will decide who are the champions, as each have a game.

Lawn Tennis: The Ashcroft lawn tennis club have meetings nearly every night and some of the amateurs are getting quite adept at the game. Probably a tournament will be arranged with Clinton to take place at Ashcroft during the Agricultural fair. A tournament of the members of the Ashcroft club takes place this afternoon at three o’clock. The club has a small membership and will probably increase as more interest is being taken in the game.

100 YEARS AGO: AUG. 12, 1922

Cattlemen Forced To Reduce Herds; Dry Weather Has Made Fodder Very Short In The Interior: The dry weather will make it necessary for cattlemen in some parts of the interior to sacrifice about half their stock because of lack of feed, says “cowboy” A.D. Keen, who is interested in a large stock ranch between Lytton and Lillooet. Feed has entirely failed this year through want of rain, he says. Alfalfa can not be cut in most cases, except where it is old crop with roots ten or twelve years old that have gone deep into the soil for moisture. Younger alfalfa crops are lost. This will necessitate the reduction of the stock by half at the very least, says Mr. Keen, because it will not pay to buy feed to tide the cattle over the winter. “Thousands of cattle will have to go to the butcher from all parts of the province within the next few weeks, and no matter whether rain comes now or not. It is too late to save the situation,” says Mr. Keen.

Ashcroft School Formerly Named “Lady Byng School”: The following is a clipping from the British Columbia Gazette, the official organ of the province: Education Department, Victoria, B.C., July 27th, 1922. Notice is hereby given that the Honourable the Council of Public Instruction has been pleased to change the name of the Ashcroft School to the “Lady Byng School”.

Clinton City News: The ground has been broken on the site of the new church, and a car of material is expected in a few days.

Water Dispute: In connection with the water dispute at Barnes lake, the water board has ordered that the Butte Ranch people can have water if they will also pump from the lake for some of the others.

Tourist Visitors: Over the highways heading into Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia, there has been pouring for the last two months a veritable stream of motorists, lured hither by the pictured charms of the Pacific Northwest and by the stories they have seen and heard of the beauties and pleasures of “America’s Summer Playground”. Cars bearing the pennants and licence plates of almost every state can be seen by watching any of the principal highways for a few hours. Every west-bound transcontinental train and the steamer lines running for the Coast ports likewise have been bearing their crowds of tourist visitors, many of whom have come to the Pacific Northwest to escape the intolerable heat of the inland and southern districts, or who have been eager to spend their vacations among the mountains or along the many water-courses of this wonder-land. Reports from various sections of the Pacific Northwest indicate that this tourist travel, both by auto and by rail, is much heavier than in any previous year.

75 YEARS AGO: AUG. 14, 1947

[From the Aug. 7 issue]: No Journal Next Week Staff To Holiday: The Ashcroft Journal will take a holiday after publication this week on August 7th, and the office and print shop will be closed until Monday, August 18th. There will be no issue of the Journal on Thursday, August 14, but publication will be resumed the following week.

50 YEARS AGO: AUG. 10, 1972

Rumours!: That the B.C. Railway (P.G.E.) will be extended south from the Clinton area to meet the C.N. and C.P. near the C.N.R. bridge at the slough. In this regard it is reported the Butte and Semlin Ranches have been sold. That Ashcroft is to have a new Post Office of some 3,500 sq. ft. floor space. That we are to have a new traffic bridge across the Thompson and a widening of the approach lanes to Highland Valley — well, we certainly hope this rumour is true and not election talk. That a by-pass is being considered north out of cache Creek. That Ashcroft is to have a population of over 5,000. How much rumour and how much truth … we wonder!

Keep Posters Off Power And Phone Poles: All political parties are being asked by B.C. Telephone Company and B.C. Hydro to refrain from attaching posters to telephone and power poles during the current provincial election campaign. Posters on poles constitute a hazard to linemen who, in a number of cases in the past, have been seriously injured because their climbing spurs have slipped on the cards, nails, and staples.

Village Of Cache Creek: Nick Sykes of Sage & Sands Trailer Park attended Council and outlined his requirement for rezoning the company’s property. The area is presently zoned “Residential Mobile Home Park”. The rezoning application was made with a view to future expansion and development of the Village business community, providing additional tax dollars, employment, and facilities for the increasing road traffic. It is planned to zone as “Highway Commercial” two hundred feet on each side of the main highways to be developed into a modern shopping area, a 50 room motel/hotel/licensed premises with adequate parking, automotive, trailer sales, and warehousing storage facilities for freight lines.

Water Rate Crackdown: Due to the fact that several water users [in Cache Creek] choose not to pay water rates, plus 10 per cent penalties, preferring to have these rates charged to taxes at year end, Council has moved and adopted that water will be shut off to these users and will not be turned on until the account is paid. Such users will be given five days past the end of the quarter in which to make payment failing which the water will be shut off.

Scotty Creek School To Close: This was the question at a public meeting called by the Board of Trustees of School Dist. 30 at a well attended meeting held at the school on the evening of August 2. Most of the parents present expressed their opinions pro and con, and the majority of them were in favour of closing the school in favour of their children attending the Cache Creek Elementary School where a wider scope of school activities would be enjoyed.

Speed Limit: A petition dated July 20, 1972 from the residents of the Mesa Vista Subdivision requesting a 20 M.P.H. [30 km/hr] speed zone within the Subdivision was received and referred for consideration.

Ashcroft Locals: Cpl. Murray Morrison, RCMP was recently promoted to the rank of Sergeant. The detachment here now has a sufficient number of constables to warrant a sergeant and corporal.



editorial@accjournal.ca

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