Striking A Balance – The good and the bad of Winter

Susan Swan's weekly column of community news and events in Clinton.

A casualty of a singe vehicle accident in the early hours of Nov. 25.

A casualty of a singe vehicle accident in the early hours of Nov. 25.

Semi Pinball?

In the early morning hours of Nov. 25 after the first snowfall of the season, a southbound out-of-control semi plowed through a utility pole at 1600 Cariboo Hwy.

It then careened across the highway and took out a second pole half way down the 1500 block on the opposite side of the highway. From there it crossed back into the right hand lane and drove through the warning sign on the bump out at the Cariboo Hwy and Lebourdais Ave. intersection, finally coming to a stop across the street from Budget Foods.

No one was injured but the semi sustained minor damages. It took crews from shortly before 1 p.m. until after 5 p.m. to replace both utility poles.

It had snowed during the night and that combined with inexperience and speeding are possible contributors to this incident.

Winter arrived early

Residents of Clinton and area awoke on Nov. 26 to find that it was snowing heavily. It snowed all day, accumulating over 35 cm (14 inches for those of us who are more used to the Imperial measurements).

The hydro also went out and most businesses in Clinton remained closed while the power was off. It gave them time to start to dig out. Village crews worked all day to clear snow but there was just too much of it to clear quickly.

Then on Thursday night it snowed again, “only” 15 cm (6 inches) in that snowfall. It will take some time for all that snow to be removed from village streets and parking lots.

As the weekend approached the temperatures dropped into the -20s. And all this wintry weather arrived a good three weeks before the official beginning of winter. By Saturday night the temperature dipped to -32 at my house. The weather station on top of Big Bar Hill reported -35!

It makes one hope that this isn’t a sign of the winter to come!

Victorian Christmas in Clinton

Various groups in Clinton are gearing up for the Third Annual Victorian Christmas Weekend on Dec. 6-7.

On Saturday, Dec. 6 many of the merchants are holding their Merchants Madness Sales from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. This is a great chance to get out and see what treasures can be found in local stores. There will be specials, draws and refreshments available.

If you are looking for crafts or Christmas baking (so you don’t have to do it yourself) you will find those at the Flea/Craft and Bake Sale in the Legion basement from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

There will be Christmas carolling and the lighting of the Christmas Tree in front of the Village Office beginning at 5:30 p.m. Dress warmly and bring a lantern (even if it is a battery powered one) if you have one. Hopefully the temperatures will have moderated by then.

Bethel Pentecostal Church is holding their Annual Community Banquet in the Memorial Hall at 6 p.m. This is always enjoyed by all that attend. The food, entertainment and sense of community is a great kick-off to the Christmas season.

The Legion Children’s Christmas Party is from 1-3 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 7. This is for pre-registered Clinton area children age 10 and under. Santa will be in attendance.

The South Cariboo Museum Society is holding an Open House at the Clinton Museum on both Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on both days. Vintage decorations will adorn their tree and you can have a look back at the history of Clinton and area.

Come and check out the Christmas lights and decorations throughout the Village and spend some time visiting the shops and activities. Hope to see you there.

Susan Swan

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