Ashcroft Museum curator Kathy Paulos with a board signed by pioneer James Haddock. Photo: Barbara Roden.

Ashcroft Museum curator Kathy Paulos with a board signed by pioneer James Haddock. Photo: Barbara Roden.

Who were the Haddocks?

A heritage event at the Ashcroft Museum looked at one of Ashcroft’s most prominent early families.

The annual summer heritage event at the Ashcroft Museum took place under smoky skies on August 18, forcing the cancellation of the planned outdoor scavenger hunt. Participants instead scoured the museum, looking for and then trying to identify 11 artefacts (Heidi and Judy Roy took home the prize, each correctly guessing what eight of the items were).

Attendees then learned about the Haddocks, who in 1886 were the first family to move to Ashcroft. Their house on Brink Street still stands, and after learning about the history of the family—particularly father James Haddock and his granddaughter Thelma, who is still well-remembered in the area—one of the home’s current owners, Gwen Dost, showed pictures of the interior and described some of the finds they made while renovating the house, including a board signed by James Haddock.

Many of the more than 200 items donated to the museum by the Haddock family over the years were also on display, giving a vivid picture of one of Ashcroft’s most prominent early families.



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