Disney Plus streaming service hits Canada with tech hurdles

Service costs $8.99 per month, or $89.99 per year, in Canada

The Walt Disney Co. logo appears on a screen above the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP Photo/Richard Drew

The Walt Disney Co. logo appears on a screen above the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP Photo/Richard Drew

Disney Plus has arrived in Canada, becoming the newest player in the growing menu of TV options, but some users say they’ve encountered technical problems trying to access the streaming platform.

A number of Canadians took to social media on Tuesday complaining they were unable to sign up for the service, which debuted a few hours earlier. Some posted screenshots of error messages that included characters from Disney’s animated movies “Wreck-It Ralph” and “Ralph Breaks the Internet.”

Other users in several regions of Canada say they received error messages which blocked them from the service, telling them they lived outside the countries where Disney Plus was available. A representative for Disney provided a written statement, but did not address the specific technical problem.

“The consumer demand for Disney Plus has exceeded our high expectations,” wrote spokesman Peter Pitino.

“We are pleased by this incredible response and are working to quickly resolve the current user issue. We appreciate your patience.”

Disney’s streaming service comes stacked with an extensive library of Disney titles, which range from animated classics “The Lion King” to Disney TV movies from decades past. There’s also a number of selections from the 20th Century Fox film library the company acquired earlier this year, including “Never Been Kissed,” “The Sound of Music” and “Home Alone.”

The new Star Wars spinoff TV series “The Mandalorian” is among the most anticipated titles on Disney Plus, and it too encountered hiccups on its debut.

Some viewers say they were initially unable to play the episode when they pulled it up, while others could hear the audio from the show, but the image was pixelated.

In Canada, Disney Plus costs $8.99 per month, or $89.99 per year, for a vast selection of offerings from Disney’s many brands, which include Pixar, Marvel and National Geographic.

There’s also an array of original TV series and films, including an episodic update to “High School Musical,” and a live-action remake of “Lady and the Tramp.”

However, not all Disney titles available stateside can be watched in Canada. Among the titles missing from the collection in Canada is “High School Musical 2,” and TV series “X-Men: Evolution” and Marvel series “Runaways.”

Viewers can sample the service with a free seven-day trial.

READ MORE: Apple rolls out new streaming TV service for $5 a month

Disney is banking on its appeal out of the gate, with Disney Plus launching in North America across nearly all major mobile and connected TV devices. That’ll give viewers an opportunity to sign up whether they use Apple, Google, Microsoft, Roku or Sony products.

David Friend, The Canadian Press

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