Caution in areas burned by wildfires

Hunters, recreationalists and backcountry users should wary of dangers

The 2018 wildfire season has been one of the most challenging in British Columbia’s history, and some areas of the province have sustained considerable damage.

Hunters, recreationalists and anyone else heading into the backcountry should use caution when travelling in areas affected by wildfires, since there may be safety hazards present.

These hazards could include:

• danger trees (fire-damaged trees that have become unstable and could fall over without warning);

• ash pits, which may be hard to detect and can remain hot long after the flames have died down;

• unstable soils and terrain;

• increased potential for landslides or rock falls;

• damaged trails or irregular trail surfaces

• increased water runoff, which could lead to flooding or debris flows; and

• damaged fencing, which could allow livestock to enter roadways.

In areas that have been severely burned, post-wildfire risks may last for two years or more.

However, the increased risk of floods or debris flows in severely burned areas may persist much longer.

Every year, post-wildfire hazard assessments are completed on significant wildfires to identify potential threats to public safety, buildings or infrastructure. Risk mitigation and rehabilitation planning are already underway in some areas.

The BC Wildfire Service reminds members of the public that they also need to use extreme caution in regions where fires are still burning.

Wildfires are active worksites where fire suppression efforts may be ongoing.

People can expect to see smouldering ground fires and smoke within the perimeters of existing wildfires over the coming weeks. This is common with large wildfires and may continue for some time. If smoke is rising from well within a fire’s perimeter and the area is surrounded by black, burned material, this is typically not a concern.



editorial@accjournal.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

However, smoke rising from green, unburned fuel or from outside a fire’s perimeter should be reported immediately.

To report a wildfire, unattended campfire or open burning violation, call *5555 on a cellphone or 1-800-663-5555 toll-free.

For the latest information on current wildfire activity, burning restrictions, road closures and air quality advisories, visit: www.bcwildfire.ca

News sources

• On Twitter: https://twitter.com/BCGovFireInfo

• On Facebook: http://facebook.com/BCForestFireInfo

Quick facts

• Area restriction orders are still in effect for Crown land in the vicinity of some active wildfires, to help protect public safety and avoid interference with firefighting activities.

• A list of areas affected by area restriction orders is available online: www.gov.bc.ca/wildfirebans

• Even if an area restriction order has been rescinded, officials engaged in fire control (including firefighters) have the authority under the Wildfire Act and its regulations to order anyone to leave the area.

More information

A Landslide and Flooding Risks Due to Wildfires brochure describes how wildfire activity may increase the risk of landslides and flooding, lists warning signs that people should watch for and advises what they should do in an emergency.

The brochure is available online: http://ow.ly/WKGJ30lNvX4

Just Posted

Ashcroft RCMP looking for witnesses after four-year-old assaulted

Boy was injured in altercation during weekend soccer tournament

Grants will help Chinook and coho get past the damaged Bonaparte fishway

Salmon will be captured and transported around fishway to get to spawning grounds

Graffiti Days 2019 a huge success

Hundreds of cars and spectators — including a History channel TV personality — turned out for the event

Bus company fears for future if another licence issued for Interior routes

Adventure Charters waiting to see if Ebus BC is approved for Prince George-Kamloops run

Sea Cadets wind up another year with Ceremonial Review

Corps is fundraising for a trip to Halifax, Nova Scotia in 2020

Video shows fireworks shot at swan in Alberta

Alberta Fish and Wildlife is investigating the incident in Grande Prairie

‘Text neck’ causing bone spurs to grow from millennials’ skulls, researchers say

Technology use from early childhood causing abnormal bone growths in 41 per cent of young adults

B.C. teen killed by fallen tree on field trip remembered as hero

13-year-old Tai Caverhill was the first to spot the tree falling and warned his friends

Surrey RCMP raises Pride flag amid din of protesters

There were about 30 protesters on either side, and 20 Mounties doing crowd control

Should B.C. get rid of Daylight Saving Time?

The province wants to know, as state governments down south make the move

Air Canada reviewing how crew left sleeping passenger on parked plane

In a Facebook post, the woman said she woke up ‘all alone’ on a ‘cold dark’ aircraft

Canadians crash out of Women’s World Cup in 0-1 loss to Sweden

Canada missed a chance to tie the game on a penalty shot

Trial dates set for three men accused of 2017 killing near Hope

Lawyers for the accused appeared in Kelowna at B.C. Supreme Court on Monday

Two bear cubs saved near Revelstoke after mother hit by car

Conservation officers trapped the cubs and transported them to a wildlife sanctuary

Most Read