Caution in areas burned by wildfires

Hunters, recreationalists and backcountry users should wary of dangers

The 2018 wildfire season has been one of the most challenging in British Columbia’s history, and some areas of the province have sustained considerable damage.

Hunters, recreationalists and anyone else heading into the backcountry should use caution when travelling in areas affected by wildfires, since there may be safety hazards present.

These hazards could include:

• danger trees (fire-damaged trees that have become unstable and could fall over without warning);

• ash pits, which may be hard to detect and can remain hot long after the flames have died down;

• unstable soils and terrain;

• increased potential for landslides or rock falls;

• damaged trails or irregular trail surfaces

• increased water runoff, which could lead to flooding or debris flows; and

• damaged fencing, which could allow livestock to enter roadways.

In areas that have been severely burned, post-wildfire risks may last for two years or more.

However, the increased risk of floods or debris flows in severely burned areas may persist much longer.

Every year, post-wildfire hazard assessments are completed on significant wildfires to identify potential threats to public safety, buildings or infrastructure. Risk mitigation and rehabilitation planning are already underway in some areas.

The BC Wildfire Service reminds members of the public that they also need to use extreme caution in regions where fires are still burning.

Wildfires are active worksites where fire suppression efforts may be ongoing.

People can expect to see smouldering ground fires and smoke within the perimeters of existing wildfires over the coming weeks. This is common with large wildfires and may continue for some time. If smoke is rising from well within a fire’s perimeter and the area is surrounded by black, burned material, this is typically not a concern.



editorial@accjournal.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

However, smoke rising from green, unburned fuel or from outside a fire’s perimeter should be reported immediately.

To report a wildfire, unattended campfire or open burning violation, call *5555 on a cellphone or 1-800-663-5555 toll-free.

For the latest information on current wildfire activity, burning restrictions, road closures and air quality advisories, visit: www.bcwildfire.ca

News sources

• On Twitter: https://twitter.com/BCGovFireInfo

• On Facebook: http://facebook.com/BCForestFireInfo

Quick facts

• Area restriction orders are still in effect for Crown land in the vicinity of some active wildfires, to help protect public safety and avoid interference with firefighting activities.

• A list of areas affected by area restriction orders is available online: www.gov.bc.ca/wildfirebans

• Even if an area restriction order has been rescinded, officials engaged in fire control (including firefighters) have the authority under the Wildfire Act and its regulations to order anyone to leave the area.

More information

A Landslide and Flooding Risks Due to Wildfires brochure describes how wildfire activity may increase the risk of landslides and flooding, lists warning signs that people should watch for and advises what they should do in an emergency.

The brochure is available online: http://ow.ly/WKGJ30lNvX4

Just Posted

B.C. BUDGET: Surplus $374 million after bailouts of BC Hydro, ICBC

Growth projected stronger in 2020, Finance Minister Carole James says

Technology allows TNRD residents to see the heat

A new library program allows residents to borrow a thermal imaging camera and check for heat loss

Are you a victim of the thermostat wars?

The battle over the thermostat is quite heated in many households.

Community Income Tax volunteers will be at local libraries to help with tax returns

Lower-income singles and families can take advantage of free tax return service

Local News Briefs: Free Family Day weekend movie at the HUB

Plus an ice fishing derby, a Fancy Schmancy Tea Party, the Million Dollar Bursary is back, and more.

VIDEO: 8 things you need to know about the 2019 B.C. budget

Surplus of $247 million with spending on children, affordability and infrastructure

‘Bullet missed me by an inch’: Man recounts friend’s killing at Kamloops hotel

Penticton man witnessed Summerland resident Rex Gill’s murder in Kamloops

B.C. BUDGET: Income assistance raise still leaves many below poverty line

$50 per month increase included in funding for poverty and homelessness reduction

B.C. BUDGET: Indigenous communities promised billions from gambling

Extended family caregiver pay up 75 per cent to keep kids with relatives

B.C. BUDGET: New benefit increases family tax credits up to 96 per cent

BC Child Opportunity Benefit part of province’s efforts to reduce child poverty

B.C. BUDGET: Carbon tax boosts low-income credits, electric vehicle subsidies

Homeowners can get up to $14,000 for heating, insulation upgrades

B.C. man survives heart attack thanks to Facebook

A Princeton man suffered a heart attack while at an isolated property with no cell service

B.C. man sues Maxime Bernier’s People’s Party over trademark

Satinder Dhillon filed application for trademark same day Maxime Bernier announced the new party

New trial ordered over banning whales, dolphins at Vancouver aquarium

Park board’s appeal reverses previous decision that found it had no right to implement a ban

Most Read