Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, who is out on bail and remains under partial house arrest after she was detained last year at the behest of American authorities, carries an umbrella to shield herself from rain as she leaves her home to attend a court hearing, in Vancouver, Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou, who is out on bail and remains under partial house arrest after she was detained last year at the behest of American authorities, carries an umbrella to shield herself from rain as she leaves her home to attend a court hearing, in Vancouver, Thursday, Oct. 3, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Huawei’s Meng ‘no longer fears unknown’ despite ‘torment, struggle’ of last year

Canadian authorities took Meng into custody at the request of the United States

Huawei Technologies executive Meng Wanzhou says she has experienced feelings of helplessness, torment and struggle since being arrested in Canada one year ago, but no longer fears the unknown.

In a post Monday on the Chinese telecom company’s website, Meng, 47, said she has passed the time on bail in one of her comfortable homes in Vancouver reading books, chatting with colleagues and painting.

Canadian authorities took Meng into custody at the request of the United States on allegations of violating sanctions on Iran, and her extradition case is now winding its way through British Columbia’s Supreme Court.

Soon after Meng was arrested, Beijing detained two Canadians, entrepreneur Michael Spavor and former diplomat Michael Kovrig, over accusations of undermining China’s national security, developments considered in Canada as retaliation for Meng’s arrest.

Canadian officials have met with Kovrig and Spavor several times, but the two have been denied access to lawyers or family while in detention.

Meng said in her post that she sees the dense forests slowly turning the hills around her home to a deep crimson as part of the beauty of nature.

“If a busy life has eaten away at my time, then hardship has in turn drawn it back out,” she said, contrasting her working life as chief financial officer of Huawei to her current “luxury of taking my time and enjoying my surroundings.”

“Right now, time seems to pass slowly. It is so slow that I have enough time to read a book from cover to cover. I can take the time to discuss minutiae with my colleagues or to carefully complete an oil painting.”

She thanked her supporters for showing up in court, saying their passion warms her heart.

Foreign Affairs Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne said last month he had spoken with his Chinese counterpart, Wang Yi, about Spavor and Kovrig at a G20 meeting, soon after taking over the portfolio.

He said securing their release was his “absolute priority” as relations with China hit a new low following the men’s arrests, nine days after Meng was taken into custody at Vancouver’s airport on Dec. 1, 2018.

Champagne said he expressed Canada’s concerns regarding “the conditions of the men’s detention” and that he and Wang were committed to continuing the discussions.

On Nov. 22, China’s ambassador to Canada, Cong Peiwu, reiterated his government’s longstanding hardline position, saying Meng’s arrest and extradition case amount to arbitrary detention, leading to the problems the two countries are experiencing and that releasing Meng would pave the way for bilateral relations to return to normal.

Hua Chunying, China’s foreign ministry spokesperson, told a news conference on Monday that she was touched by Meng’s blog post, adding that she is “an innocent Chinese citizen held without cause.”

“China’s position on this incident is clear cut and firm. The U.S. and Canada abused their bilateral extradition treaty and arbitrarily took compulsive measures against a Chinese citizen without cause,” she says in a transcript posted to the ministry’s website.

Meng is accused of lying about Huawei’s relationship with its Iran-based affiliate Skycom to one of its bankers, HSBC, but she denies any wrongdoing and the allegations have not been tested in court.

READ MORE: Media asks court to approve broadcast, webcast of Meng’s extradition hearings

READ MORE: New foreign minister presses for Canadian detainees with China counterpart

The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Robert Dale Stanton of Clinton was last heard from on Jan. 9, and police are asking for the public’s assistance in locating him. (Photo credit: RCMP)
Police ask for help in locating missing Clinton man

Robert Dale Stanton was last heard from on Jan. 9 and is believed to be in the Clinton/70 Mile area

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
253 new COVID-19 cases, 4 more deaths in Interior Health over the weekend

More than 1,000 cases in the region remain active

Interior Health update. File photo.
86 new COVID-19 cases, two more deaths in Interior Health

The new deaths are from Heritage Square, a long-term care facility in Vernon

A power outage Thursday night left nearly 3,000 homes in Clinton and the 70 Mile areas in the dark. (Katie McCullough photo).
Updated: Clinton, 70 Mile left in the dark after vehicle crashes into transmission pole

BC Hydro still working to restore power to 330 homes in 70 Mile House

A woman wearing a protective face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 walks past a mural in Victoria, B.C., on Monday, Dec. 7, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
115 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths in Interior Health

There are now a total of 4,970 cases in the region

B.C. Representative for Children and Youth Jennifer Charlesworth (Black Press files)
B.C. watchdog says mentally ill children and youth retraumatized in hospital

The number of children held under the Mental Health Act has increased an alarming 162 per cent in past decade

A new video from NCCIH and BC Northern Health titled ‘Healing in Pandemic Times: Indigenous Peoples, Stigma and COVID-19’ was animated by Joanne Gervais. (Photo Provided By: NCCIH Archives)
VIDEO: Stigma against Indigenous people is a ‘social sickness’

A new short animated video is aiming to educate the public on the stigmatization

A pinniped was attacked by an unseen predator off the shores of Dallas Road Monday night. (Courtesy of Steffani Cameron)
VIDEO: Seal hunting, not being hunted in video shot off Victoria waterfront

Victoria woman captures footage of pinniped activity off Dallas Road

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau provides an update on the COVID-19 pandemic from Rideau Cottage in Ottawa on Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau provides an update on the COVID-19 pandemic from Rideau Cottage in Ottawa on Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Trudeau vows to keep up the fight to sway U.S. on merits of Keystone XL pipeline

Canada’s pitch to the Biden team has framed Keystone XL as a more environmentally friendly project than original

The British Columbia Hotel Association (BCHA) sent out a sharply worded release late last week, in which it noted that the Tourism Industry Association of BC recently obtained a ‘legal opinion’ on the matter (Alex Passini photo)
Hotel associations push back against any potential ban on inter-provincial, non-essential travel restrictions

B.C. Premier John Horgan is seeking legal advice on banning non-essential travel

JaHyung Lee, “Canada’s oldest senior” at 110 years old, received his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021. He lives at Amenida Seniors Community in Newton. (Submitted photo: Amenida Seniors Community)
COVID rapid tests in long-term care key during vaccine rollout: B.C. care providers

‘Getting kits into the hands of care providers should be a top priority,’ says former Health Minister

Island Health chief medical officer Dr. Richard Stanwick receives a first dose of Pfizer vaccine, Dec. 22, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C. turns to second doses of COVID-19 vaccine as supplies slow

Pfizer shipments down until February, to be made up in March

B.C.’s Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Training announced funding to train community mental health workers at four B.C. post-secondary institutions. (Stock photo)
B.C. funding training of mental health workers at four post-secondary institutions

Provincial government says pandemic has intensified need for mental health supports

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
No Pfizer vaccines arriving in Canada next week; feds still expect 4M doses by end of March

More cases of U.K. variant, South African variant found in Canada

Most Read