Ashcroft’s new water treatment plant is up and running, and there will be a grand opening and tour for members of the public on Nov. 19. The new washroom facility for the Legacy Park campground is at left. Photo: Barbara Roden

Ashcroft’s new water treatment plant is up and running, and there will be a grand opening and tour for members of the public on Nov. 19. The new washroom facility for the Legacy Park campground is at left. Photo: Barbara Roden

New Ashcroft water treatment plant is up and running

A grand opening and public tours are planned for Nov. 19

Residents of Ashcroft are benefiting from new drinking water infrastructure, and there will be a grand opening of the Village’s new water treatment plant on Nov. 19.

The event will take place at the plant, which is beside the Legacy Park near the northern end of Railway Avenue, from 1 to 3 p.m. Members of the public are invited to the opening, which will feature a tour of the new plant and refreshments afterwards.

Thanks to joint funding from the governments of Canada and British Columbia through the New Building Canada Fund–Small Communities Fund (SCF), the Village of Ashcroft received funding in 2015 to construct a new community water treatment plant, which includes an upgraded water main pump station, to accommodate increased water demands within the community.

The treatment plant receives raw water from an existing pipeline without impeding the water flow rates of the Thompson River, and will generate potable water for residents and businesses in Ashcroft for years to come.

The new plant also features, at the north end, new washroom facilities for the use of those staying at the Legacy Park campground, with the men’s and women’s washrooms containing wheelchair-accessible toilet stalls and showers. There are also a coin-operated washer and dryer, and outside the building there is a sink and counter so that campground users can wash large items.

The total estimated cost for the project is $8,588,036. The Government of Canada provided up to $2,862,678 through the SCF, and the Province of B.C. contributed up to $2,862,678. The Village of Ashcroft provided all remaining costs for the project.

“Our government is making major investments in the services people count on,” says Selina Robinson, Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing. “The Ashcroft Community Water Treatment plant is a great example of all levels of government working together to build greener, healthier communities across the province, and we are proud to support it.”

Through the SCF, the governments of Canada and B.C. each committed up to $109 million to support public infrastructure projects in communities that have fewer than 100,000 residents. These investments will help address their unique and wide-ranging infrastructure priorities, improve service delivery, and provide economic opportunities across B.C.’s small communities.



editorial@accjournal.ca

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