It’s hard to see through the smoke, but pictured is Ashcroft on the morning of August 18, taken from across the Thompson River. Photo: Barbara Roden.

It’s hard to see through the smoke, but pictured is Ashcroft on the morning of August 18, taken from across the Thompson River. Photo: Barbara Roden.

Seek help if you are affected by smoky skies

Smoke generated by wildfires can cause serious health issues.

In light of continuing smoky skies due to wildfire impacts in the region, Interior Health has issued the following statement on behalf of Dr. Trevor Corneil, Chief Medical Health Officer and VP Population Health.

“Wildfires across the province have resulted in smoky skies and poor air quality for many Interior Health communities. During times of poor air quality, it’s important that individuals take steps to protect their health and well-being. Over the last week we have received questions from community members and local organizations about the health risks of strenuous outdoor activities.

“In BC we use the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) to make recommendations for modifying outdoor activity and/or avoiding smoke. This index takes into consideration levels of particulate matter, NO2, SO2, and other gases that are known to negatively impact lung capacity, heart function, and blood flow to muscles and brain tissue. Smoke affects everyone differently, but those most at risk include individuals with underlying medical conditions such as asthma, COPD, heart disease, or diabetes, and infants, the elderly, and pregnant women.

“The best way to protect your health when skies are smoky is to reduce your exposure and seek cleaner air. When the AQHI is moderate or higher (equal to or above 4), Interior Health recommends that individuals consider reducing or avoiding strenuous activities, and follow the recommendations provided on the BC Air Quality website at http://bit.ly/2txGBco.

“If you are experiencing clinical symptoms of any kind, contact your health care provider or local walk-in clinic. If your symptoms are severe, seek emergency medical attention.”

For more information on precautions when air quality is poor, visit www.interiorhealth.ca or contact HealthLink BC at 8-1-1.



editorial@accjournal.ca

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