Photo by Tom Zytaruk

Surrey court clerk files human rights complaint related to concussion

Deborah A. Ryane claims her employer discriminated against her on basis of mental disability

A Surrey provincial court clerk has lodged a human rights complaint alleging she was discriminated against in her employment on the basis of a mental disability.

Deborah A. Ryane filed a complaint with the British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal. The respondents are the Queen, Surrey Provincial Court Services, Laura Singer and Katharine Morrison.

The Tribunal heard Ryane began working in a new location several months after an accident that left her with a severe concussion. She had been hit by a car and was thrown off her bicycle on May 11, 2016, resulting in short-term memory issues, difficulty focusing, anxiety and depression.

She alleges that Court Services didn’t accommodate her disability, resulting in her needing to take a medical leave of absence.

She claims Morrison, as a manager at Surrey provincial court, and Singer, as a senior manager there, discriminated against her. They deny the accusation and applied to have Ryane’s complaint dismissed. None of the claims have yet been proven or disproven in a hearing before the tribunal.

Tribunal member Norman Trerise heard that Ryane began working as a clerk at the Vancouver Law Courts on Nov. 15, 2011 and on Nov. 18, 2015 had advised Singer she wished to apply for a transfer to Surrey provincial court as she had friends in White Rock and wanted to be closer to her son, who was in the navy. Conversely, Ryane said she did not say she wanted to be in Surrey but wanted to leave downtown Vancouver because she afraid of being hit by another car and no longer felt comfortable riding her bike to and from work there.

READ ALSO: Publication ban lifted on transgender complainant’s name in Surrey waxing dispute

READ ALSO: Human rights complaint about Costco backpack search dismissed

READ ALSO: Woman files human rights complaint against former Surrey employer, alleging racial discrimination

She was granted a “suitability” interview on Sept. 9, 2016. The respondents claim she didn’t tell the interviewers she had cognitive disabilities that would limit or restrict her job duties.

“They say that Ms. Singer advised that Surrey provincial court was a busy, high-volume court but that Ms. Ryane advised that she loved a challenge and would have no issue with the volume of work at Surrey court because she enjoyed being busy,” Trerise noted in his July 19 reasons for decision.

Ryane claimed she was provided with no training in performing her new job in Surrey and that the resulting pressure resulted in her needing to take a medical leave of absence in the spring of 2017. The respondents, on the other hand, claim she received numerous training days.

The Tribunal heard that a doctor’s certificate in March 2017 stated Ryane was unable to return to Surrey provincial court because of her medical condition but she could return to work on May 29, 2017 at a different courthouse such as Kamloops.

Ryane claimed the respondents were responsible for a delay in paperwork that resulted in her not returning to work until she learned of a position in Kamloops on June 29, 2018.

The respondents maintain they were not responsible for the delay.

Trerise decided to deny the respondents’ application to have dismissed Ryane’s allegations that Surrey provincial court services failed to accommodate her move to the Surrey court by failing to provide suitable training. Conversely, he also dismissed Ryane’s complaint that Surrey Provincial Court Services and Singer discriminated against her by delaying her return to work.

“This decision should not be taken as a finding that the complaint is likely to succeed on the remaining issue at the hearing of this matter,” Trerise noted. “I would suggest that the parties avail themselves of the Tribunal’s mediation processes and attempt to resolve this issue prior to hearing.”



tom.zytaruk@surreynowleader.com

Like us on Facebook Follow us on Instagram and follow Tom on Twitter

Just Posted

Embrace growth or risk losing incorporation, says Cache Creek mayor

Public hearing on rezoning raises concerns about increased traffic and noise

Year in Review: Cache Creek homicide, Merritt church arson, and a fire engine fundraiser

Plus Citizens of the Year, a new bus service, a surprise birth, a forgotten treasure, and more

Ashcroft Santa Parade attracted hundreds of happy onlookers

Three lucky shoppers won ‘Ashcroft Bucks’ to spend in downtown businesses

Local News Briefs: The CP Holiday Train is coming

Plus the Jrush Dance winter recital, free live music in Kamloops, an Escape Room, and more

‘Hi Santa: Remember when your elves called me a monster?’

Letters to Santa from Ms M. Marlow’s Desert Sands Community School Grade 3/4 class

B.C. woman charged in connection to stolen vehicle smash-up in Kamloops

Kersten Ina Peters was arrested in the Fraser Valley on Friday, Dec. 6

Tavares scores twice as Maple Leafs earn 4-1 win over Canucks

Vancouver sees two-game win streak snapped

UPDATED: No survivors in Gabriola Island plane crash: RCMP

Coroner confirms multiple fatalities after small plane goes down Tuesday night near Nanaimo

VIDEO: Harbour Air makes history with first electric aircraft test flight

Successful flight marks first of its kind in the world

The Grinch who Stole a Hedge: Security camera captures Chilliwack tree theft

RCMP arrives as person calmly walks away with tree in downtown area

Salmonella outbreak in Canada linked to rodents and snakes

92 cases of salmonella across six provinces, including B.C.

Meng Wanzhou wins right to more documents involving arrest at Vancouver airport

Defence lawyers allege the Huawei executive was unlawfully detained, searched and interrogated

Truck with body inside found at bottom of lake near Kootenay ferry

Investigators believe no foul play is expected but are unsure how the vehicle ended up in the Arrow Lakes

Most Read