UVic extended the course drop deadline for full tuition fee reimbursement in wake of fatal bus crash involving two students. (Photo courtesy of UVic)

UVic extended the course drop deadline for full tuition fee reimbursement in wake of fatal bus crash involving two students. (Photo courtesy of UVic)

University gives students more time to drop courses following fatal bus crash

Extension allows students to receive full refund

The University of Victoria (UVic) has extended the deadline for tuition fee reimbursement reductions in the wake of the fatal mid-Island bus crash involving two first year students.

UVic has worked to accommodate and support the students and staff who are processing the deaths of eighteen-year-olds Emma Machado and John Geerdes. The pair were among 48 passengers en route to the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre when their bus rolled down an embankment on Sept. 13.

READ ALSO: UVic president offers condolences after two students killed in bus crash

READ ALSO: Bus crash survivor petitions Justin Trudeau to fix road where classmates died

Due to the extenuating circumstances, the Office of the Registrar anticipated that a higher number of students may be looking to drop courses to relieve some stress. On Wednesday, the university announced that the drop date had been moved from Sept. 17 to Sept. 20 to allow students more time to decide about their fall semester courses.

The university acknowledged that many students have been affected by the incident either directly or indirectly and, in an effort to minimize barriers, moved the deadline. Typically students have until mid-September to drop courses and receive a full tuition reimbursement and after the drop-date passes they’ll only get 50 per cent back if they choose to drop a course.

For more information about course registration and drop dates, visit the UVic website.


@devonscarlett
devon.bidal@saanichnews.com

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