Members of the Fountain View School of Music at a concert at Thompson View Lodge and Manor this past weekend. Photo: Seanna Sampson.

Letters to the Editor

Readers write about some Christmas spirit, as well as help for cancer patients needing transport

Dear Editor,

The Pine Street (Ashcroft) Snow Angel would like to thank Willow and Steve from Home Building Centre for their generous price reduction on ice melt, to help my Better at Home clients with their snow removal.

Ward Blake

Ashcroft, B.C.

Dear Editor,

What a wonderful herald to the season, when the singers and musicians from Fountain View School gave the seniors of Thompson View Manor and Lodge a concert on Saturday, Dec. 1

Violin, cello, flute, and organ accompanied the singers’ harmony of carols and religious songs. The section of “Winter” from Vivaldi’s Four Seasons was played with the energy that only youth with genuine feeling can generate, and filled the Lodge. It was a privilege to hear presentations of professional quality.

The Fountain View School of Music is situated a few miles from Lillooet. It has been in that lovely setting for over 20 years, yet few people seem to be aware of it.

The school attracts students from all over the world. Fountain View offers a comprehensive program of music, as well as an academic education. There is also a farm, which students cultivate and harvest every year.

The students later mingled with the residents and enjoyed refreshments. Two small boys, one of them an aspiring violinist of only three years, added a little humour to the festivities.

These young people give performances in many countries. I can only imagine the youthful energy and talent they impart wherever they go to so many people.

Esther Darlington

Ashcroft, B.C.

Dear Editor,

In light of Greyhound bus lines reducing service in British Columbia, the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS) wants to take the opportunity to reach out to any people living with cancer who may be impacted by this withdrawal of service.

No matter where you live, CCS is here to ensure that no Canadian has to face cancer alone.

Like other British Columbians, we were concerned when we learned of Greyhound’s decision to reduce service in the province.

We know that the bus service provided transportation for people facing cancer who had to travel from rural areas to larger city centres for treatment at a lower cost than other transit options.

If you need us, regardless of where you live, here’s how we’re ensuring that you don’t have to face cancer alone.

In some communities in B.C., CCS is partnered with the Freemasons Cancer Car Program to help people with cancer receive rides to and from primary cancer treatment appointments, such as chemotherapy and radiation. Our travel treatment fund can help by providing financial assistance for low income individuals who need to travel for cancer treatment.

Additionally, if you need to fly to get treatment, CCS continues to connect people with cancer with Hope Air, which provides free travel for people with cancer who meet their eligibility guidelines (see www.hopeair.ca for more information).

We understand that a cancer diagnosis can make you feel alone and raise many questions and concerns, whether you are living with cancer yourself or caring for someone who is.

CCS also offers a number of non-transportation related programs to help support Canadians living with cancer. Through our Cancer Information Service, CCS can connect you with cancer information specialists who can answer your questions and provide reliable cancer information.

If you’d like to speak with someone who has been through a similar cancer experience to you, then our Peer Match program will pair you with a trained volunteer who can provide you with the support you need.

You can also join our online community—www.CancerConnection.ca—if you have cancer or are caring for a loved one with cancer and want to connect with people going through similar experiences. And if you’d like to offer support to people with cancer in your community, CCS offers peer support group facilitator training to help start and sustain community support groups.

No matter where you are or what type of cancer you’re facing, CCS is here for you. For more information on any of the programs or services, or if you have any questions about cancer, please call us at 1-888-939-3333 or visit www.cancer.ca.

Andrea Seale

Executive Director,

Canadian Cancer Society,

British Columbia & Yukon

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