Letters to the Editor

Readers write about council matters, and there’s a thank you to the Health Care Auxiliary

Dear Editor,

Am I the only one looking for continuation of the article on the fiscal condition of the region (“State of the North report shows region’s fiscal state”, The Journal, Jan. 31, page 1) and not being able to find it? It ends in the Journal with mention of the positive impact of tourism, but alas, never raises its hopeful head again. [The article continued and concluded on page 9 of the Jan. 31 issue.]

I have some questions about issues in this area. Affordable housing is the chief one. We are aware that the rail port development two kilometres from Ashcroft is hiring workers in significant numbers. Workers have families. Where will they live?

The need for senior housing increases every year, in both communities. What is being done about this? For example, there are tenants in our Thompson View Manor who are from Clinton and other places. The need for housing for seniors has become imperative. A province as rich as B.C. should be able to provide housing for families with variable incomes, yet there is a dearth of available housing everywhere.

I’ve heard mention of the dunes on the Mesa above Ashcroft as a possible area for housing development. As a former member of council, some investigation about the stability of the soil on the Mesa was made years ago. A tentative warning was given that the stability of the Mesa could be doubtful, if development became substantial.

Building on sand and gravel can be dicey, as some have discovered. As well, we have the railroad. Traffic has increased in recent years. Prolonged waits at the tracks have become common. Contemplation of ambulances and fire protection, as a result, does not bear thinking about without some trepidation.

The deterioration of the Tingley Street property is another large issue which council must deal with. Absentee landlords holding property who pay the taxes every year but fail to develop and maintain the property is a formidable issue. Still, it is an issue that can and must be dealt with by council. What is council doing about this issue? The public has a right to be made aware.

And how is the water treatment plant construction coming along? Can we expect this to be completed by spring, as forecast?

These are the issues I look for in my local newspaper. I suspect other subscribers may also wish to have information of this nature. Mr. May, the new reporter for municipal issues, has not contributed anything of this nature yet. I would urge Mr. May to consult with council and investigate them.

Esther Darlington

Ashcroft, B.C.

Dear Editor,

Until I started paying attention to local government affairs, I did not fully realize nor appreciate the skill set those in the teaching profession posses. Individual teachers have one year to make an impression on a child in their charge, and judging by the number of times past school interactions are brought up in family and friend conversations, I would have to say that most teachers do make a substantial impact within this time frame. That is because teachers get things done.

Special classroom events, school-wide events, and inter-school events requiring dedicated investments of time and determination are pulled off, concurrently as another one is being conceptualized, often within a few weeks. It is an organizational feat to feed, occupy, and engage young minds and bodies, not to mention to research available funds, arrange transportation, anticipate potential problems, and submit comprehensive itineraries. Yet teachers do so regularly on limited budgets, with restricted resources and in a timely manner because not to do so would be a lost opportunity to make a difference.

At the first Village council meeting of this year, mayor and councillors opted to opt out of sponsoring the Gold Country Annual Tourism Symposium and Fam Tour by first defeating a motion to provide financial support to Gold Country Communities Society and then by voting to receive and file the information. Although there was some interest expressed, apparently, there was “not enough time” to make all the necessary arrangements. The event is scheduled to take place May 3–4 of 2019.

Gold Country Communities Society hosts this epic opportunity for the region to showcase its dynamic and unique rural communities. The society organizes workshops, informative presentations, an evening reception, and performances by local musicians. Requirements for sponsoring the 2019 event include a facility with a capacity of 150 minimum that has tables and chairs, additional space for break-out groups and workshops, a suggested $2,500 financial commitment, and an appointed committee who has an excellent working relationship with local businesses in order to be the point of contact for organizing a familiarization tour of the community.

Three-and-a-half months to source an appropriate facility, to accommodate spending $2,500 from the budget, and to strike a committee seems more than enough time to get this done. Ask any teacher.

Gloria Mertens

Ashcroft, B.C.

Dear Editor,

A generous donation was given to Better at Home by the wonderful, hard-working volunteers of the Ashcroft and District Health Care Auxiliary. I am thrilled to have received the funds, and have such admiration for their incredible work and dedication to our communities.

A big thank you to all those who donate to the Health Care Auxiliary as well: the donations, sales, etc. all help out programs within our area. We are extremely lucky to have such great community support in this area.

Nancy Kendall

Better at Home Coordinator

Ashcroft and Cache Creek



editorial@accjournal.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Young woman from Cariboo Chilcotin victim of highway fatality near Cache Creek

Police said the 23-year-old driver crossed the centre line on Highway 1 near Juniper Beach

LIVE STORY: Mission-Matsqui-Fraser Canyon candidates square off at forum

Join the Journal as we feature live coverage of the Oct. 16 forum at the Ashcroft HUB

“It’s much more personal, much more vicious. There’s a willingness to go low and be dirty.”

Federal Green Party leader Elizabeth May reflects on an election campaign like no other she’s known

Enjoy a hot meal and help support Sea Cadets on Oct. 17

Interior Savings staff will be serving up a by-donation meal at the Legion on Thursday

Historic 19th century Ashcroft church gets very modern addition

St. Alban’s Church, built in 1891, now boasts a solar array that will meet its electricity needs

More beef products recalled due to possible E. coli contamination

The food safety watchdog has been investigating possible E. coli 0157:H7

B.C. VIEWS: How to get the best deal on your ICBC car insurance

ICBC slowly being dragged into the 21st century

Pot legalization has gone ‘well’, but ‘yellow flags’ on vaping: task force chair

Canada legalized cannabis for non-medical use on Oct. 17, 2018,

ELECTION 2019: Federal leaders hit final 24 hours of campaign

Many leaders remain in B.C. for the final hours of the campaign

Jack’s Devils beat Quinn’s Canucks 1-0 in NHL brother battle

New Jersey youngster scores first career goal against Vancouver

Two charged after owner’s wild ride through Kamloops in his stolen truck

Crystal Rae Dorrington, 37, and Derrick Ronald Pearson, 32, facing multiple charges

Judge orders credit union’s bank records for Kelowna social worker facing theft allegations

The man is accused of negligence, breach of contract, fraud and a conspiracy with Interior Savings

Leaders pour it on with rallies, boosts for candidates as campaign reaches peak

The federal election campaign has reached a crescendo

Most Read