Letters to the Editor

A reader changes her mind about the Eco-Depot

Dear Editor,

After reading the impassioned, reasonable letters of the residents of Boston Flats regarding the Eco-Depot (The Journal, May 9), I’ve changed my mind: not only about the location of the depot adjacent to prime agricultural land, but about the needs of the families living there.

Without consultation with the residents, it would seem the decision by the Thompson-Nicola Regional District is arbitrary, and certainly without regard for the area’s recent history.

We seemed to have had a perfectly convenient solution to the problem of recycling packaging, glass, tin cans, and paper at the recycling depots in Ashcroft and Cache Creek. Many people were aghast when the depots there were suddenly (it seemed, and without consultation with the communities) removed. Predictions that people would soon give up, and items like these would be abandoned beside roads and byways, were certainly not far-fetched.

The mayors of our towns who attended regular meetings of the TNRD were not heard to express concerns about this. Yet even a casual canvassing of opinions could have made the concerns public.

I was moved by Natalie Kellington’s letter. I was also impressed by the letter of Gord and Corry Fehr. Under the circumstances expressed so movingly and adequately, I think another, more appropriate location should be found as soon as possible.

Esther Darlington

Ashcroft, B.C.

Dear Editor,

On June 6, 1944, Toronto’s Allan Bacon was one of thousands of Canadians to arrive by boat on the shores of Juno Beach in Normandy, France. As this year marks the 75th anniversary of D-Day, 99-year-old Bacon is reflecting on that pivotal event.

Bacon enlisted with the Royal Regiment of Canada in 1940 and was later transferred to the Canadian Scottish Regiment. When his tour of duty took him to Normandy, his role was in the mortar platoon. On June 17, 1944, Bacon was based in a barn, anticipating an attack that never came. He went into a nearby shed to disarm the grenades when one exploded, resulting in the loss of his right arm.

When Bacon realized he’d lost his arm, his first thought was, “This will break my mother’s heart.” Bacon recovered at a hospital in England, where he learned to use his left arm through exercises like washing windows.

On returning to Canada, he became a member of The War Amps, an Association started by amputee veterans returning from WWI to help each other adapt to their new reality. Today, Bacon continues to be active with The War Amps Toronto Branch.

Through the years he, along with his fellow War Amps members, have made it a goal to remember and commemorate their fallen comrades, and to educate youth about the horrors of war. “In Normandy, many Canadians died or suffered wounds that they had to carry for the rest of their lives,” says Bacon. “On anniversaries like D-Day, it’s important that we never forget.”

Martine Lépine

Manager, Communications

The War Amps



editorial@accjournal.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

100 Mile woman arrested after dramatic incident in Ashcroft

Diane Carol Priester allegedly rammed police cruiser in attempt to evade capture

First presumptive case of coronavirus identified in the Interior Health region

The woman, in her 30s, travelled from Shanghai and lives in the interior

TNRD purchases property for new Ashcroft/Cache Creek Eco-Depot

New facility will be built at former chip reload plant site off Highway 1

Ashcroft council supports curling club and rink in 2020 budget

Budget includes funds to do necessary equipment upgrades at curling rink

Grant allows Ashcroft seniors to benefit from music and memories

New program will help seniors at Thompson View, Jackson House, and beyond with the gift of music

Protesters barricade Premier John Horgan’s home ahead of B.C. budget unveiling

Demonstrators from the Extinction Rebellion have blocked the Langford driveway

Budget 2020: B.C. adds tax to sweet drinks and sodas

All soda, vending machine drinks will be subject to higher PST

Budget 2020: B.C. unveils new grant for students, phases out debt-relief program

For the first time, diploma, certificate students qualify for yearly post-secondary grant

2020 Budget: ICBC shortfall continues ahead of new rate-reduction plan

ICBC operating with $91-million deficit for 2019-2020 fiscal year

Budget 2020: B.C. NDP taps top tax bracket for more revenue

Minimum wage set to pass $15 an hour by 2021

Budget 2020: Not much new for B.C.’s struggling forest industry

Focus on wood waste utilization, efficiency, ministry budget cut

Skull reconstruction gives new insight into unknown man found in B.C. cemetery

RCMP released a 3-D skull reconstruction of a man who was found dead on July 2, 1998

Forest industry supporters and convoy arrive at B.C. legislature in Victoria

Rally delivers petition in favour of ‘working forests’

Ten poisoned eagles rushed to veterinary hospital in Nanaimo

Eagles stricken after eating flesh of euthanized animal at Nanaimo Regional Landfill

Most Read