Letters to the Editor

A Clinton resident thanks Good Samaritans at Historic Hat Creek

Dear Editor,

I would like to thank the staff at Historic Hat Creek Ranch and the visitors who helped when I had a medical episode on Sunday, July 28 and ended up in hospital.

Thank you all so very much. Nice to know there are still some good and kind people out there!

Thank you again.

Geraldine Tierney

Clinton, B.C.

Dear Editor,

The world is getting smaller, no doubt about it. Now more than ever, if a butterfly flits its wings on one side of the planet, there is a reaction, however small, on the opposite side.

Shouldn’t we then consider our fellowmen, everywhere? What if we can do so and at the same time make a smart investment for the planet?

Canadians have shown time and again that we care, and we have a unique opportunity to do so again through the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. One might be tempted to think that Canadians are not affected by these diseases, but given international travel, and the presence of TB in our First Nations communities up north, we are all at risk.

It is time to make it known to our MPs and prime minister that this is a matter of great importance both at home and abroad. In terms of making this a great investment, it was estimated in 2016 that for every US$1 invested in the Global Fund, there would be a US$22 return in terms of annual health care costs globally.

Let’s make this world a better place for all!

Connie Lebeau

Victoria, B.C.

Dear Editor,

If light strikes carbon dioxide (CO2) molecules, it’s converted into heat. The more CO2 in the atmosphere, the more light is converted into heat and the warmer the atmosphere becomes.

The atmospheric concentration of CO2 was 280 parts per million (ppm) for the million years prior to the industrial revolution. It maintained the Earth’s average surface temperature at 15° C.

Since the industrial revolution, atmospheric CO2 has risen to over 400 ppm because of our fossil fuel combustion. In 1979, an eminent American physicist determined that doubling atmospheric CO2 from 280 ppm to 560 ppm would increase the Earth’s average surface temperature by 3° C and cause “significant and damaging” changes within decades.

The fossil-fuel industry, fearing for its profits, squandered millions on denial and disinformation. The fossil fuel industry, auto makers, electric utilities, and Western governments have known the risks of climate change since 1979. Now we all know that greed trumped science.

Robert Macrae

Castlegar, B.C.



editorial@accjournal.ca

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