SOME OF THE MOST CAPTIVATING landscape in the area is down at the Ashcroft slough.

The cold weather brings out the best

It's no real surprise that the cold weather that defines us as Canadians is also responsible for some of our better personality traits.

It’s always struck me as odd how, as weather conditions worsen, people are more apt to leave their snug homes to be in the company of others.

When we lived up north, community events that were held on cold, miserable, blizzard-y nights always had the best turnout. I suspect Cabin Fever may have played a small part in that.

It’s obvious from my chair at The Journal that this is the busiest time of year. As the melting snow turns into warm winds and school closes down for the summer, most groups do likewise as people head out of town for vacations or recreation.

Trying to find anyone to talk about news is next to impossible.

However, first hint of Winter and everyone is scrambling madly to get the Christmas preparations in place. (Actually, it begins with Halloween and gets more frantic as Remembrance Day comes and goes.)

There are a few Snowbirds, but life in our small communities apparently goes on without them.

From now until New Years the pace will be frantic – bazaars and suppers, parties and concerts. Then Jan. 1 arrives and it’s quiet – nay, dead – for days afterwards as everyone recuperates. And then back to work at a slower pace… until the snow melts.

Perhaps it’s also the cold weather that keeps us active. Movement keeps us warm. Hot weather makes us drowsy.

Or possibly, staying busy takes our attention away from how abysmally cold it is outside.

But most of all, I have a sneaking suspicion that as the daylight hours dwindle, we instinctively come together for protection against whatever hungry beasts may be prowling the perimeter. The lights and heating of our public gathering places provide a modern alternative to the old bonfire.

Whatever you choose to believe, there is no shortage of events to get you out of the house, from the local production of My Fair Lady that opens tomorrow night, to the New Years dances in each of our communities. Hopefully no hungry prowling beasts out there to devour you.

This is the best of small town living.

Wendy Coomber is editor of the Ashcroft-Cache Creek Journal

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