Local History

An ad for the Gateway Groceteria from August 1947 is a reminder that ‘self service’ in retail establishments was a relatively new concept at the time, and was beginning to supplant the old model of having a clerk fill your order. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)

In 1947, Donkey Baseball – the ‘laugh-riot of the season’ – comes to Ashcroft

What on Earth is Donkey Baseball, you ask? Read on to find out

 

The second Ashcroft school, pictured around 1890. By 1897 the school was felt to be too small for the number of students, and the provincial government was petitioned for funds to add a second room. A new, larger school would not be built until 1899. (Photo credit: Ashcroft Museum and Archives)

In 1972, Cache Creek council cracks down on water scofflaws

Users who refuse to pay water rates told taps will be turned off until payment is made

 

Some things never change, as shown by this editorial cartoon from August 1922. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> arvives)

In 1922, a huge swarm of grasshoppers descends on Merritt

‘For three straight days it literally snowed grasshoppers’ noted one observer

 

(July 27, 1972): An ad for the PNE Star Spectacular ’72 show. (Photo credit: <em>Journal </em>archives)

In 1897, passions run high regarding a new school for Ashcroft

‘The people here are strongly of a mind to tell the Hon. School Commissioner to go to Hades’

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(July 27, 1972): An ad for the PNE Star Spectacular ’72 show. (Photo credit: <em>Journal </em>archives)
A brick-making business set up in Clinton in the 1890s was touted as an inexpensive local alternative to building with lumber, but the idea never caught on. Today, the only building made from Clinton brick that remains in the community is the museum, which was originally used as a schoolhouse. (Photo credit: South Cariboo Historical Museum Society)

In 1947 the Fraser Canyon sees heavy traffic: 800 cars in one day

Plus in 1897, Clinton-made bricks are touted as a home-grown replacement for lumber

A brick-making business set up in Clinton in the 1890s was touted as an inexpensive local alternative to building with lumber, but the idea never caught on. Today, the only building made from Clinton brick that remains in the community is the museum, which was originally used as a schoolhouse. (Photo credit: South Cariboo Historical Museum Society)
‘Red Cross Beginners Class At Ashcroft Swimming Pool’ (July 13, 1972): ‘(Left to right) Gerald Peterson, Trevor Thibeault, Brad Jackson, Duane Dickinson, Charlee Marlow. Absent: Colin Couves, Annette Thibeault, Charlie Ovington, Billy Robins.’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)

In 1922, a plea to the province to allow prescribed burning

Ashcroft and area farmers ask government to allow burning of ‘useless timber’ to protect range land

‘Red Cross Beginners Class At Ashcroft Swimming Pool’ (July 13, 1972): ‘(Left to right) Gerald Peterson, Trevor Thibeault, Brad Jackson, Duane Dickinson, Charlee Marlow. Absent: Colin Couves, Annette Thibeault, Charlie Ovington, Billy Robins.’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)
The Harvey Bailey store was a fixture in Ashcroft for decades, and is pictured here prior to the 1916 fire. It was rebuilt, and in 1947 changed hands, although the name was retained. (Photo credit: Ashcroft Museum and Archives)

In 1947, an Ashcroft landmark gets a change of ownership

The Harvey Bailey store had been a part of Ashcroft since its inception in 1887

The Harvey Bailey store was a fixture in Ashcroft for decades, and is pictured here prior to the 1916 fire. It was rebuilt, and in 1947 changed hands, although the name was retained. (Photo credit: Ashcroft Museum and Archives)
Nanaimo city council, at a meeting this week, voted to repeal a bylaw relating to public morals which prevented people from making use of any “profane, obscene, blasphemous or grossly insulting language.” (City of Nanaimo image)

B.C. city repeals 130-year-old bylaw banning drunken singing

City of Nanaimo retains bylaw banning nuclear weapons, but takes several other bylaws off the books

Nanaimo city council, at a meeting this week, voted to repeal a bylaw relating to public morals which prevented people from making use of any “profane, obscene, blasphemous or grossly insulting language.” (City of Nanaimo image)
‘Ashcroft and District Stampede Queen And Princess Chosen At Fashion Show’ (June 22, 1972): ‘Pictured are the five contestants for Stampede Queen. (Left to right): Nelda Stocking, Cheryl Oliver, Roberta Morgan, Penny Cumming, and Sheila Booth. Chosen Queen was Sheila Booth and Roberta Morgan Princess. Congratulations!’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)

In 1972, an Ashcroft Stampede Queen and Princess are crowned

Sheila Booth is the 1972 Stampede Queen, and Roberta Morgan is the Princess

‘Ashcroft and District Stampede Queen And Princess Chosen At Fashion Show’ (June 22, 1972): ‘Pictured are the five contestants for Stampede Queen. (Left to right): Nelda Stocking, Cheryl Oliver, Roberta Morgan, Penny Cumming, and Sheila Booth. Chosen Queen was Sheila Booth and Roberta Morgan Princess. Congratulations!’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)
An advertisement in the June 19, 1897 issue of the <em>Journal</em> advertising the steamer <em>Charlotte</em>, which plied the Fraser River between Soda Creek (east of Williams Lake) and Quesnel and offered travellers a welcome alternative to the stagecoach for part of the journey to the goldfields. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)

In 1897, a new steamer on the Fraser River promises luxurious travel along the Cariboo Road

The Charlotte would be a welcome break from stagecoaches for weary travellers

An advertisement in the June 19, 1897 issue of the <em>Journal</em> advertising the steamer <em>Charlotte</em>, which plied the Fraser River between Soda Creek (east of Williams Lake) and Quesnel and offered travellers a welcome alternative to the stagecoach for part of the journey to the goldfields. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)
‘10th Annual Ashcroft & District Stampede Queen Contestants’ (June 8, 1972): Contestants Sheila Booth, Penny Cumming, Roberta Morgan, Cheryl Oliver, and Nelda Stocking. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)

In 1972, donated toilets are sought for new Ashcroft arena

Plus flooding risks, the Queen’s jubilee, butter is off rationing, and a despondent cat

‘10th Annual Ashcroft & District Stampede Queen Contestants’ (June 8, 1972): Contestants Sheila Booth, Penny Cumming, Roberta Morgan, Cheryl Oliver, and Nelda Stocking. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)
‘Premier Presents Semlin Plaque To C.C. Mayor’ (June 1, 1972): B.C. premier W.A.C. Bennett (l) presents the Semlin Plaque to Cache Creek mayor Art MacLean. Charles Augustus Semlin, who owned a ranch east of Cache Creek, was the MLA for Yale-West and premier of B.C. from August 1898 to February 1900. (Photo credit: Journal archives)

In 1972, Premier ‘Wacky’ Bennett pays a visit to Cache Creek

Premier presented a plaque honouring former premier, and Cache Creek rancher, Charles Semlin

‘Premier Presents Semlin Plaque To C.C. Mayor’ (June 1, 1972): B.C. premier W.A.C. Bennett (l) presents the Semlin Plaque to Cache Creek mayor Art MacLean. Charles Augustus Semlin, who owned a ranch east of Cache Creek, was the MLA for Yale-West and premier of B.C. from August 1898 to February 1900. (Photo credit: Journal archives)
‘Ashcroft Fire Department Presents Huge Cheque To Hospital’ (May 18, 1972): ‘(From left to right): Findlay Anderson, Don Gerhardt, Ning Quan, Ken Lawn, Chairman of Hospital Board, Roy Crooks and Terry Porter. Presenting cheque for $1,322 to new hospital. The Ashcroft Firemen’s Association would like to give a special thanks to their wives for their assistance towards the Push-a-Thon; also, thanks to all the citizens of Ashcroft and Cache Creek who donated.’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)

In 1972, a rattlesnake bite leaves a man 20 minutes from death

An incident with an angry rattler near Spences Bridge could have been tragic

‘Ashcroft Fire Department Presents Huge Cheque To Hospital’ (May 18, 1972): ‘(From left to right): Findlay Anderson, Don Gerhardt, Ning Quan, Ken Lawn, Chairman of Hospital Board, Roy Crooks and Terry Porter. Presenting cheque for $1,322 to new hospital. The Ashcroft Firemen’s Association would like to give a special thanks to their wives for their assistance towards the Push-a-Thon; also, thanks to all the citizens of Ashcroft and Cache Creek who donated.’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)
Overhead view of the T.U. Auto Camp in Cache Creek, date unknown. The site is now occupied by the post office; what is now the Todd Road Bridge is to the left of the picture, just out of view. (Photo credit: Ashcroft Museum and Archives)

In 1972, Kumsheen Secondary School in Lytton destroyed by fire

School was located on site of current K–12 building on the Trans-Canada Highway

Overhead view of the T.U. Auto Camp in Cache Creek, date unknown. The site is now occupied by the post office; what is now the Todd Road Bridge is to the left of the picture, just out of view. (Photo credit: Ashcroft Museum and Archives)
‘Merrill Shudders Every Time He Thinks Of It’: A cartoon from the May 12, 1922 issue of the <em>Journal</em> takes a humorous look at a newfangled device — the radio — and envisions a time when it can communicate messages to youngsters, meaning they’re never out of reach of their parents. ‘Gee whiz — You can’t tell what this radio thing might grow into — gee whiz!’ If only the cartoonist had known, a century ago, how prophetic a vision this was. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)

In 1922, a break-in at the Ashcroft post office causes concern

Thief comes away with little gain but leaves a piece of evidence behind

‘Merrill Shudders Every Time He Thinks Of It’: A cartoon from the May 12, 1922 issue of the <em>Journal</em> takes a humorous look at a newfangled device — the radio — and envisions a time when it can communicate messages to youngsters, meaning they’re never out of reach of their parents. ‘Gee whiz — You can’t tell what this radio thing might grow into — gee whiz!’ If only the cartoonist had known, a century ago, how prophetic a vision this was. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)
‘Environment Week Clean-up By Ashcroft And Cache Creek Students’ (May 4, 1972): ‘Mrs. Poirier Grade 2 class were busy picking up at Cache Creek.’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)

In 1972, construction of a new Ashcroft high school is approved

New school would contain 17 classrooms and accommodate up to 450 students

‘Environment Week Clean-up By Ashcroft And Cache Creek Students’ (May 4, 1972): ‘Mrs. Poirier Grade 2 class were busy picking up at Cache Creek.’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)
‘Mayor Art MacLean Buys First Cookies’ (April 27, 1972): ‘Pictured are Mayor Art MacLean of Cache Creek buying Guides cookies from (left to right) Jamie Lynn McIntyre, Debbie Friesen, and Brenda Murrell. Rangers, Guides, and Brownies will be out selling cookies commencing Saturday, April 29 and all next week. Be sure and buy some.’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)

In 1972, vandalism causes major damage in Barnes Lake area

Flooding washes out roads and fields and causes local ranchers to restrict access to the area

‘Mayor Art MacLean Buys First Cookies’ (April 27, 1972): ‘Pictured are Mayor Art MacLean of Cache Creek buying Guides cookies from (left to right) Jamie Lynn McIntyre, Debbie Friesen, and Brenda Murrell. Rangers, Guides, and Brownies will be out selling cookies commencing Saturday, April 29 and all next week. Be sure and buy some.’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)
‘Queen Candidates For Ashcroft Rodeo June 24, 25’ (April 20, 1972): (from l) Nelda Stocking, Cheryl Oliver, Sheila Booth, Penny Cumming, Roberta Morgan. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)

In 1947, Ashcroft Legion Branch #113 Women’s Auxiliary formed

Plus big fish, low speed limits, Stampede Queens, a pool for Ashcroft, and more

‘Queen Candidates For Ashcroft Rodeo June 24, 25’ (April 20, 1972): (from l) Nelda Stocking, Cheryl Oliver, Sheila Booth, Penny Cumming, Roberta Morgan. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)
‘Talented Artist At Clinton’ (April 6, 1972): ‘Lynne Nelson of Clinton, who recently was snapped in the mall of Thompson Park, Kamloops, where she had a display of her oil paintings which were all scenes in the Clinton, Cache Creek, and South Cariboo areas. The paintings were excellent and would adorn any living room.’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> files)

In 1897, Ashcroft to Lillooet an ‘easy’ ten-hour stagecoach ride

Also in 1897, many claims being staked at Highland Valley after rich copper find

‘Talented Artist At Clinton’ (April 6, 1972): ‘Lynne Nelson of Clinton, who recently was snapped in the mall of Thompson Park, Kamloops, where she had a display of her oil paintings which were all scenes in the Clinton, Cache Creek, and South Cariboo areas. The paintings were excellent and would adorn any living room.’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> files)
‘Ashcroft Firemen’s Pushathon Huge Success’ (March 30, 1972): ‘Pictured with bed from left to right are: Gordon Matthews, Joe Lomond (back), Roy Crooks, Don Habermehl, Al Peterson, Bob Rodford, Morley Zant, Bill Manderson (front).’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)

In 1947, a Cache Creek pioneer is keeping the town on the map

Plus sporting news, dope traffic, the Clinton Ball, and more from the archives

‘Ashcroft Firemen’s Pushathon Huge Success’ (March 30, 1972): ‘Pictured with bed from left to right are: Gordon Matthews, Joe Lomond (back), Roy Crooks, Don Habermehl, Al Peterson, Bob Rodford, Morley Zant, Bill Manderson (front).’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)