In 1946 the Big Horn Auto Camp near Spences Bridge gets a pool

Big Horn Auto Camp south of Spences Bridge, no date, showing the swimming pool, which was built in 1946. (Photo credit: Ben Bradley)Big Horn Auto Camp south of Spences Bridge, no date, showing the swimming pool, which was built in 1946. (Photo credit: Ben Bradley)
Hauthier’s Hotel (later the Globe Hotel) in Lytton, pictured in 1885. The <em>Journal</em> reported that the hotel burned to the ground in early September, 1896.Hauthier’s Hotel (later the Globe Hotel) in Lytton, pictured in 1885. The Journal reported that the hotel burned to the ground in early September, 1896.
The Ashcroft Museum, pictured <em>c.</em> 1960 when it was located in the fire hall on Railway Avenue. (Photo credit: Ashcroft Museum and Archives)The Ashcroft Museum, pictured c. 1960 when it was located in the fire hall on Railway Avenue. (Photo credit: Ashcroft Museum and Archives)
ASHCROFT SWIM CLUB AGGREGATE WINNERS (from Sept. 2, 1971): ‘Girls aggregate winners in the Swim Meet last Sunday, by Ashcroft swimmers were Colleen Bundus, left and Yvonne Croswaithe. Ross Noble, absent, won the boys aggregate for Ashcroft.’ All spellings as per the original cutline. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)ASHCROFT SWIM CLUB AGGREGATE WINNERS (from Sept. 2, 1971): ‘Girls aggregate winners in the Swim Meet last Sunday, by Ashcroft swimmers were Colleen Bundus, left and Yvonne Croswaithe. Ross Noble, absent, won the boys aggregate for Ashcroft.’ All spellings as per the original cutline. (Photo credit: Journal archives)
PIPE FOR GAS BEING LAID (Aug. 26, 1971): ‘Inland Natural Gas crew has been laying pipe for about a month, having crossed the Semlin and Circle 7 Ranches, crossed the bridge and are now working in Ashcroft Village.’ The picture is looking south down what is now Highway 97C, with Government Street and the Ashcroft bridge on the left. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)PIPE FOR GAS BEING LAID (Aug. 26, 1971): ‘Inland Natural Gas crew has been laying pipe for about a month, having crossed the Semlin and Circle 7 Ranches, crossed the bridge and are now working in Ashcroft Village.’ The picture is looking south down what is now Highway 97C, with Government Street and the Ashcroft bridge on the left. (Photo credit: Journal archives)
THE LITTLE BARN (Aug. 26, 1971): ‘Pictured is the newest store in Cache Creek where everything sold is thoroughly Canadian. Proprietress Ray Eckford has scrubbed, cleaned and decorated it with a rustic and old-fashioned motif. The counter wall shows fashions at the turn of the [last] century taken from old pages of Harper’s Bazaar magazine. Lighting fixtures are old red lanterns centred with an electric globe. The store holds all kinds of goodies, all authentic Canadian-made crafts, pottery, wood carving, bead work, tapestry, tole painted pottery and woodwork. Bill Eckford’s pot-bellied stove and huge anvil are still there too and to anyone having known him happy memories come flooding back in this “Little Barn” as Rae has named her business. Good luck Rae and may you be as happy there as we knew your dad was!’ (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> archives)THE LITTLE BARN (Aug. 26, 1971): ‘Pictured is the newest store in Cache Creek where everything sold is thoroughly Canadian. Proprietress Ray Eckford has scrubbed, cleaned and decorated it with a rustic and old-fashioned motif. The counter wall shows fashions at the turn of the [last] century taken from old pages of Harper’s Bazaar magazine. Lighting fixtures are old red lanterns centred with an electric globe. The store holds all kinds of goodies, all authentic Canadian-made crafts, pottery, wood carving, bead work, tapestry, tole painted pottery and woodwork. Bill Eckford’s pot-bellied stove and huge anvil are still there too and to anyone having known him happy memories come flooding back in this “Little Barn” as Rae has named her business. Good luck Rae and may you be as happy there as we knew your dad was!’ (Photo credit: Journal archives)

125 YEARS AGO: AUG. 29 and SEPT. 5, 1896

SUMMERTIME: The weather still continues very warm but the heat has somewhat abated through the smoke caused by the forest fires.

LOCAL NOTES: It seems to be quite the fashion that when C.A. Semlin, J.C. Barnes, J. Hemans and John Wilson, or some of the many oldtimers stay over night in town, some of our old staid citizens are apt to stay out late. So much visiting to do we suppose, talking over old times, etc.

LYTTON FIRE: The Globe hotel, owned by A.F. Hauthier, was completely destroyed by fire at three o’clock Thursday morning. So far the cause of the fire cannot be ascertained but it is thought a lamp was knocked over or exploded, as all the fires were out shortly after 7 o’clock the preceding night. Only a few articles of furniture were saved from the office, the fire spreading rapidly making it dangerous for any one to venture inside. Luckily the wind was not up to its usual strength or there would have been very little left of Lytton to tell the tale. Mr. Stevenson’s store and the post office were in danger for some time but willing hands with a few buckets of water soon quenched the flames in that direction.

LOCAL NOTES: Soon the wandering Ashcroftites who have been recreating at Vancouver and other places for the past month will return and with a long drawn sigh tell what a splendid time they have had.

100 YEARS AGO: AUG. 26 and SEPT. 2, 1921

ENTERTAINMENT: A kid and a dog will hold the screen at the Ashcroft Theatre on September 2nd and 3rd in “The Big Adventure”, the Universal story in which “Breezy” Eason, the wonder-child of the silent drama, plays the title role. The diminutive star is four years old in his stocking feet and has an irresistible grin that sets on the heart like nitroglycerine acts on a safe.

DANCE AT CACHE CREEK: One of the most enjoyable social events of the year in this vicinity, in the form of a dance party, took place at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Dick Clark, Cache Creek, on Tuesday of this week. Dancing commenced at 9 p.m. and continued until about 3 a.m., and was one of the “best ever”, according to those who attended. A number was present from Ashcroft and Clinton, and all retired satisfied beyond words. The social aspect of the event is reported to have been of the most harmonious nature.

ANNOUNCEMENT OF GENERAL ELECTION EXPECTED TONIGHT: The opinion expressed in political circles is that at a great political meeting to be held in London, Ont., this evening, Premier [Prime Minister] Meighen will announce dissolution of parliament, with a general election probably in December. There will be an intensive campaign of about three months, with the tariff as the principal issue. The decision to hold an election before redistribution is said to be due to the announcement that the complete census returns will not be ready before December, and to the premier’s belief that, with a number of by-elections ahead, and the possibilities of sickness and vacancies, his majority is becoming too small to carry on government satisfactorily.

75 YEARS AGO: AUG. 24 and 31, 1946

HOPE-PRINCETON ROAD: Work on the Hope-Princeton road has been somewhat retarded by the shortage of men and lack of supplies due to strikes. Contracts on this link between the Coast and the interior of the Province, to date amount to $2,892,000. The contracts call for the road to be completed by September of next year.

VISIT ASHCROFT LABOUR DAY: As summer holidays draw to a close the B.P.O. Elks committee in charge of Labour Day celebrations are speeding up their efforts to make this year’s celebrations the best yet. There will be a baseball tournament forenoon and afternoon [on Monday and Tuesday]. There will be wheels of fortune, race games, etc. both evenings on Railway Avenue. To top the day’s programme there will be dances in the Community hall both nights, commencing at 10 p.m. Admission to dance $1 per person. Good music guaranteed. Come one, come all!

BIG HORN CAMP HAS SWIMMING POOL: The Big Horn Auto Camp a few miles west of Spences Bridge on the Cariboo road have added a cement swimming pool to other attractions at their resort. The pool was recently completed and already is being enjoyed by patrons of the camp. Mr. and Mrs. Leachty bought the property from the George family, the founders, about two years ago, and are planning improvements and extensions. Already three more cabins are under way, and they have in contemplation a lodge building that will add to their accommodation, and make the camp one of the most up to date along the Cariboo road.

CACHE CREEK: Evidently the Bonaparte bridge at Cache Creek is not in the right place. At least that’s the report we have from one Washington motorist, who tried crossing just below the T.U. Auto Camp [where the post office is now] and landed in the middle of the river.

50 YEARS AGO: AUG. 26 AND SEPT. 2, 1971

LYTTON NEWS: The [fire] Department has been plagued by false alarms during irregular hours of the morning the past few months. It is hoped with school going back in a few days, these calls will stop. Parents are asked to please talk to their children regarding this matter, as it is felt that children under the age of sixteen are mainly responsible. It makes it hard for the men who are giving up their time, all hours of the evening, to answer these alarms, to find it is some pranksters who feel it is a laughing matter. These man have regular jobs to go to early in the morning and it is too bad that because of a few irresponsible children that they have to be disturbed at all hours of the day and night, seven days a week.

ASHCROFT MUSEUM (by Sam H. Harrison, museum curator): The Ashcroft Museum seems to be holding its own as far as visitors. Last year around 3,524 saw the museum and this year so far there were 2,315. This makes 57 thousand visitors since the building was opened in 1960. Two silver spoons were give out so far this year. The person who makes the thousandth visitor receives the spoon. Visitors have come from all over the world and the remarks are very good and educational. I don’t think we will pass the 3,500 mark this year, but it goes to show that the museum is well known. To move the museum to another location would be detrimental to Ashcroft. The tourists come down the main street. They come to buy and to see the museum. [Ed. note: In 1971, the museum was located in the fire hall building on Railway Avenue. It moved to its current location in 1982.]



editorial@accjournal.ca

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