New charges laid in police probe into incidents at St. Michael’s College School

New charges laid in police probe into incidents at St. Michael’s College School

Six students previously charged with assault, gang sexual assault and sexual assault with a weapon

An investigation into allegations of physical and sexual assault at a prestigious all-boys private school has led to multiple charges against a total of seven students, Toronto police said Wednesday.

Insp. Domenic Sinopoli, head of the force’s sex crimes unit, said investigators had concluded an ongoing probe into a total of eight incidents of alleged abuse at St. Michael’s College School, all involving members of the football program.

Sinopoli said that while police did not lay charges in five of the eight incidents because they were not conclusively criminal or because victims opted not to pursue the matter, a total of seven students now face charges in three incidents that allegedly took place on school grounds between September and November of this year.

Six students had previously been charged with assault, gang sexual assault and sexual assault with a weapon in connection to a November incident that was captured on video.

Sinopoli said four of those students, plus one more, were arrested on Wednesday in an alleged sexual assault believed to have taken place on Oct. 17. Two of those previously charged are also accused of assault and assault with a weapon in a third incident that allegedly took place on Sep. 18.

“We do not have any evidence or complaints to suggest that this type of behaviour extended outside of this school year or involved anyone outside this small group of students,” he said.

“Our research into these incidents and our past dealings with the college did not suggest any trend that would lead someone to believe that this is an ongoing and systemic problem.”

Sinopoli said none of the school’s faculty or staff, including former principal Greg Reeves, are facing charges in the various incidents.

St. Michael’s issued a statement shortly after the police news conference expressing a commitment to eradicating such incidents in the future.

“This is another painful and heartbreaking day, but also a necessary step in our school’s journey as we learn the truth about the terrible incidents that happened, and rededicate ourselves to both immediate and long-term change,” interim president Rev. Andrew Leung said. ”We are committed to understanding why this behaviour happened and what led to it, and to putting measures in place to ensure it does not happen again.”

READ MORE: Former students share stories of bullying at St. Michael’s dating back decades

The sexual-assault scandal at the Catholic school garnered widespread public attention and led to the resignation of its top two officials.

St. Michael’s has since established a “respect and culture” review panel that is set to report its findings by the summer. A tip line for students to report any concerns or allegations was also set up.

The school also cancelled its football program for the next year, citing “problematic dynamics” on those teams.

Police said they had identified two alleged victims of sexual assault through their investigation who were both now receiving support.

Sinopoli said, however, that a video of one of the alleged incidents continues to circulate, causing ongoing trauma for the alleged victim. Police had previously stated that the video met the threshold for child pornography.

He said a video of the new suspected sexual assault may also exist, though police have not seen it.

The high-profile investigation has touched off an important conversation about school safety and appropriate conduct, Sinopoli said, noting it got underway only when a concerned student came forward to the school principal.

“This particular case has brought much-needed attention to this type of behaviour,” he said. “Physical and sexual abuse cannot be tolerated anywhere, let alone in schools where children should feel safe. Parents, students and teachers are all talking about this and of what is expected of them, and that is a good thing.”

With files from Nicole Thompson

Liam Casey and Michelle McQuigge, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Ashcroft hospital emergency closed sign, 2016. Photo credit: Barbara Roden
Ashcroft Hospital emergency department closed this weekend

Closure due to unexpected limited physician availabiliy, says Interior Health

Residents line up outside the Vernon Recreation Complex for their COVID-19 vaccine Saturday, June 5. (Jennifer Smith - Morning Star)
No appointments necessary for first dose COVID-19 vaccine: Interior Health

People can just show up at clinics, register on the spot and get the shot

Heidi Roy of the Cariboo Jade Shop in Cache Creek with the 3,000 jade boulder, which is now on secure display inside the shop. (Photo credit: Barbara Roden)
Massive jade boulder returns to Cache Creek store six months after daring heist

The 3,000-pound boulder was stolen on Dec. 19, 2020 and found abandoned in the bush a week later

Dr. Albert de Villiers, chief medical health officer for the Interior Health Authority. (Contributed)
Child sex crimes charges against Interior’s top doc won’t impact pandemic response: Dix

Dr. Albert de Villiers is charged with sexual assault and sexual interference

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a plenary session at the G7 Summit in Carbis Bay, England on Friday June 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada donating 13M surplus COVID-19 vaccine doses to poor countries

Trudeau says the government will pay for 87 million shots to be distributed to poor countries

The BC Ferries website went down for a short while Monday morning following a provincial announcement that recreational travel between health authorities can resume Tuesday. (Black Press Media file photo)
BC Ferries’ website crashes in wake of provincial reopening announcement

Website back up now, recreational travel between health regions to resume as of Tuesday

The Kamloops Indian Residential School is photographed using a drone in Kamloops, B.C., Monday, June, 14, 2021. The remains of 215 children were discovered buried near the former school earlier this month. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Communities grapple with what to do with former residential and day schools

Some tear them down as a tool to help healing, others repurpose them as tools for moving forward

FILE – Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry talks about B.C.’s plan to restart the province during a press conference at Legislature in Victoria, Tuesday, May 25, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. officials watching U.K.’s Delta variant struggles, ‘may need to slow’ restart plan

Studies show that one dose of vaccine is only 33 per cent effective in preventing B.1.617.2 spread

RCMP Const. Shelby Patton is shown in this undated handout photo. RCMP say that Patton was hit by an allegedly stolen truck that he had pulled over on Saturday morning in Wolseley, east of Regina. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO, RCMP
Pair charged in Saskatchewan Mountie’s death make first court appearance

Const. Shelby Patton was hit by an allegedly stolen truck that he had pulled over Saturday morning

David and Collet Stephan leave for a break during an appeal hearing in Calgary on Thursday, March 9, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Todd Korol
Appeal Court rejects stay for Alberta couple facing third trial in son’s death

Pair accused in their earlier trials of not seeking medical attention for their son sooner

Highway notices like this come down effective June 14. Public health restrictions on non-essential travel and commercial operation have hit local businesses in every corner of B.C. (B.C. government)
Province-wide travel back on in B.C.’s COVID-19 restart plan

Gathering changes include up to 50 people for outdoor events

Calgary Stampeders’ Jerome Messam leaps over a tackle during second half CFL western semifinal football action in Calgary, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2015.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
CFL football will be played this summer in Canada

Governors vote unanimously in favour to start the ‘21 campaign on Aug. 5

Citizenship Minister Marco Mendicino holds a press conference in Ottawa on Thursday, Nov. 12, 2020. The federal government is announcing that Indigenous people can now apply to reclaim their names on passports and other government documents. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Indigenous people can now reclaim traditional names on their passports and other ID

Announcement applies to all individuals of First Nations, Inuit and Métis background

Most Read