B.C. residents accused in ‘honour killing’ appeal extradition to India

Two face conspiracy to commit murder charge of Pitt Meadows student in 2000

Two Maple Ridge residents facing extradition to India are in the B.C. Court of Appeal this week, asking that their orders be declared invalid and quashed.

Lawyers for Malkit Kaur Sidhu, in her late 60s, and Surjit Singh Badesha, in his early 70s, filed their applications in October 2017.

Sidhu and Badesha were facing extradition after being charged in India with conspiracy to commit murder in connection with the June 2000 death of former Pitt Meadows secondary student Jaswinder Kaur Sidhu, also known as Jassi.

Malkit is Jassi’s mom and Surjit Singh Badesha is her uncle.

The applications were filed in the B.C. Court of Appeal in October 2017, stating that Canada’s justice minister, on Sept. 28, 2017, refused to accept the applicant’s submissions, didn’t follow the principles of natural justice and violated the pair’s Charter rights.

The earlier extradition of the two Maple Ridge residents was stayed in September 2017 after one of the lawyers filed an appeal, while Sidhu and Badesha were in custody in Toronto, on their way to India to face trial.

According to Appeal Court documents, Sidhu and Badesha made additional submissions in the weeks before the Supreme Court of Canada ruled in favour of extradition in September 2017.

Sidhu was told by the justice minister that she would not be removed while the minister decided whether to reconsider the surrender order.

However, on Sept. 20, both were moved out of the institutions where they were detained.

A three-judge panel is hearing the appeal from Nov. 5 to 7 in Vancouver.

Malkit Kaur Sidhu and Surjit Singh Badesha are accused by India of conspiracy to commit murder from Canada.

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