Get proper permit before cutting or obtaining firewood

There is no charge for obtaining firewood from Crown land as long as you have the right permit

With the colder weather here, many people are now lighting their fireplaces and wood stoves, and residents are reminded that anyone who cuts, collects, or uses firewood must ensure that it is harvested legally.

A Free Use Permit for Firewood is free and allows people to collect and transport firewood from eligible Crown land for their personal use. Getting a permit is easy, since the application form is available online. Alternatively, people can visit their local natural resource district office to apply for a permit in person.

The completed permit will verify where it is legal for people to gather firewood within a particular natural resource district. For each natural resource district, the firewood permit describes areas where firewood collection is permitted, allowable collection methods, and how much firewood can legally be collected.

It is important for applicants to confirm that the wood they wish to cut or collect is on Crown land, not on private land or on a First Nations reserve. Maps of natural resource districts are available online or at the district office to assist applicants.

There is no charge for the wood that is collected under a Free Use Permit for Firewood. However, the applicant must read and understand the conditions of the permit prior to signing it (the permit must be signed and dated by the person collecting the firewood); carry the permit at all times; and produce the permit at the request of a natural resource officer, conservation officer, or peace officer.

Cutting down trees on Crown land without an appropriate permit (or selling any such firewood) is illegal, and could result in a violation ticket or fine. Unlawful firewood collection can create safety hazards for recreationalists and other forest users. It can also negatively affect ecosystems, including fish and wildlife habitat.

The public can do its part to stop illegal harvesting by only buying firewood from legitimate producers who sell wood obtained either on private land or through authorized Crown land harvesting tenures.

Anyone buying firewood should ask where the firewood comes from (Crown land or private land) and ask for a record of purchase. For firewood harvested on private land, the buyer should ask the seller for the district lot number and timber mark number.

For firewood harvested on Crown land, legitimate commercial firewood producers should have a Forestry Licence to Cut document signed by the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development.

Firewood permit applications and maps of natural resource districts in B.C. are available online at http://www.gov.bc.ca/firewoodpermits.



editorial@accjournal.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Ashcroft council receives winter road maintenance update

Council also votes to enter a float in this year’s Santa Parade

Cache Creek council report

Issues at Cache Creek water treatment plant are a big concern

The Rundown: Clinton News

High speed internet in Clinton hits a roadblock, and more from recent Clinton council meeting

Clinton-area author draws on own experiences for her books

Dorothy Jepp grew up on High Bar First Nation and writes the books she wanted to see as a child

Ashcroft business makes the leap to main street location

Gemini Wellness has moved from the Ashcroft HUB to a storefront on Railway Avenue

VIDEO: ‘Climate emergency’ is Oxford’s 2019 Word of the Year

Other words on the shortlist included ‘extinction,’ ‘climate denial’ and ‘eco-anxiety’

A pawsitive ending: Missing puppy found after nine-day search in Chilliwack

Pit bull Frankie ran from dog sitter booked through app

Federal laws at heart of West’s anger up for debate, as Liberals begin outreach

Vancouver mayor to Trudeau’s western critics: ‘Get over yourselves’

Snowboard pioneer Jake Burton Carpenter dies at 65

He was diagnosed with testicular cancer in 2011

Teen developed ‘popcorn lung’ due to vaping: Ontario doctors

Boy went from being in perfect health to being on life support after just five months

B.C. judge tosses ‘N’ driver’s claim he was just using phone to decline his mom’s call

Distracted driving laws are more strict for Class 7, or Novice drivers, the judge noted

Woman calls 911 to say she was late for train, asks Ontario police for ‘emergency ride’

Peel Regional Police received more than 180,000 improper calls so far this year

It could take you 218 years to save up for a house in this B.C. neighbourhood

It would take 27 years in the most affordable city in the Lower Mainland

‘Actors can play any roles’: Debate over ‘colour-blind’ casting after Victoria lawsuit

Tenyjah Indra McKenna filed a complaint over racially-motivated casting

Most Read