The advent of mega displays and holiday inflatables has caused demands on the provincial power load to rise since 2012. Photo: Anthony92931.

Increasingly large holiday displays increasing province’s power consumption

One in three people surveyed said they have a ‘mega display’ in their neighbourhood

A new BC Hydro report finds that the trend towards more elaborate holiday displays has increased the province’s power load from electronic decorations and lights by about 15 per cent since 2012, adding to costs for many.

The report—titled “From Grinch to Griswold: Trend toward bigger holiday displays increasing electricity bills” (http://bit.ly/2rgQVqJ)—found about a 40 per cent drop in outdoor lighting load by 2011 because of the mass adoption of LEDs, which use 90 per cent less energy. Since then, however, it has increased due to more elaborate outdoor displays.

In fact, a survey commissioned by BC Hydro found one in three British Columbians have a neighbour with a mega display. The survey also found these holiday fans are:

· Installing inflatable holiday decorations: These decorations have become increasingly popular over the past decade, and add to costs because they are typically run 24/7 and use a lot more power than a strand of LED bulbs.

· Using lots of lights and electronics: Four per cent said they install more than 750 lights each year, and this number can climb to over 100,000 lights for the biggest displays.

· Pushing the limits: Fifteen per cent admit to blowing a breaker switch from overloading their lights and decorations.

Lighting these elaborate displays with older, incandescent bulbs is expensive. Clark Griswold’s infamous holiday display in the film National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation would have cost him around $4,700 during the holiday season using incandescent lights, compared to the $50 it would have cost if it was lit by LEDs.

The survey also found that 57 per cent of British Columbians put up outdoor holiday lights, and among those people there are different levels of decorating enthusiasm:

· The Grinch (42 per cent): No holiday lights, no added cost.

· The holiday minimalist (38 per cent): Three strands of lights, on average.

· The holiday enthusiast (13 per cent): Eight strands of lights, on average.

· The holiday fanatic (also known as “The Griswold”; six per cent): At least 10 strands of lights, and often much more to light up the entire block.

Although most British Columbians are putting up lights, one-third of displays are still using some older inefficient incandescent holiday lights, which increases their energy costs and consumption.

British Columbians can save around $40 over the holiday season by switching eight strands of incandescent lights to energy-efficient LEDs. LED holiday lights also last 10 times longer and come in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and colours.

For more tips on saving energy this holiday season, visit www.bchydro.com.



editorial@accjournal.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Cache Creek landfill extension set for September completion

Project has been delayed due to wildfires and floods over past two years

Drag races set to return for Graffiti Days weekend

Annual event features old favourites like the smoke show, and new events like a drive-in movie

Bonaparte River fishway, Thompson steelhead among projects awarded grant funding

More than $9 million will help 170 fish and wildlife projects around B.C.

Wellness clinics provide free, drop-in health information

New service in Clinton helps patients manage their health care and stay out of hospital

Police say it’s “impressive” no arrests were made after Raptors celebrations

Toronto will play the Western Conference champion Golden State Warriors next

Social media giants in hot seat as politicians consider regulations in Ottawa

Committee members will also grill representatives from Facebook, Twitter

Wildfire crews watching for dangerous wind shift in High Level, Alta.

The Chuckegg Creek fire is raging out of control about three kilometres southwest of the town

UN urges Canada to take more vulnerable Mexican migrants from Central America

The request comes as the United States takes a harder line on its Mexican border

Mistrial declared in Jamie Bacon murder plot trial

Bacon was on trial for counselling to commit the murder of Person X

B.C. VIEWS: Money-laundering melodrama made for TV

Public inquiry staged to point fingers before 2021 election

Canadian homebuyers escaping high housing costs by moving to secondary cities

In British Columbia, exurbs have grown in the Hope Valley and Kamloops

Feds lay out proposed new rules for voice, video recorders in locomotives

Transport Canada wants to limit use of recorders to if a crew’s actions led to a crash

Most Read