Passengers step off a plane carrying Canadians back from Oakland, Calif. from the Grand Princess cruise ship, after it arrived at Canadian Forces Base Trenton in Trenton, Ont., on Tuesday March 10, 2020.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg

Passengers step off a plane carrying Canadians back from Oakland, Calif. from the Grand Princess cruise ship, after it arrived at Canadian Forces Base Trenton in Trenton, Ont., on Tuesday March 10, 2020.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg

228 Canadians from cruise ship Grand Princess begin quarantine at CFB Trenton

There were 237 Canadians among the 3,500 passengers and crew on board the Grand Princess cruise ship

Some 228 Canadians are beginning a two-week quarantine at Canadian Forces Base Trenton, in Ontario, after being repatriated from a cruise ship with a cluster of novel coronavirus cases.

A government-chartered aircraft carrying Canadians from the Grand Princess cruise ship landed at the military base early Tuesday, however not all the 237 Canadians from the ship were on board.

Foreign Affairs Minister Francois-Philippe Champagne told reporters that a “handful” of crew members tested positive for the COVID-19, although he declined to give specific numbers.

“We have certain crew members, a very limited number of crew members, which tested positive which are Canadian on the ship, and they will remain on the ship in accordance with the protocol that has been agreed with the CDC and local and state authorities in the U.S.,” Champagne said in Ottawa outside the entrance to a cabinet meeting.

Some other Canadians remained in California for health reasons that were unrelated for the virus, he said.

VIDEO: B.C. records first COVID-19 death in Canada as province hits 32 cases

There were 3,500 passengers and crew on board the Grand Princess cruise ship, which docked Monday at the Port of Oakland after days of being forced to idle off the coast of Northern California amid evidence it was the breeding ground for more than 20 COVID-19 infections.

Canada’s top doctor has urged Canadians to avoid all cruise travel, saying the confined quarters and frequent interactions can foster the spread of the illness.

Meanwhile, Canadian officials have been racing to develop a co-ordinated response to COVID-19, which has infected more than 100,000 people in 100 countries around the world.

Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland wrote the provinces and territories asking them to inform the federal government of their state of readiness and any shortages they’re facing ahead of Friday’s first ministers meeting in Ottawa.

The meeting with provincial and territorial leaders will include discussions on the potential impact of the spreading virus on the country’s health-care system and its economy.

Canada had at least 79 cases of the respiratory illness as of Tuesday morning: 32 in British Columbia, 36 in Ontario, seven in Alberta and four in Quebec.

Finance Minister Bill Morneau also sought to reassure nervous investors on Monday, saying the Canadian economy can weather the economic impacts of the novel coronavirus.

The country’s finances are healthy enough to help individuals and businesses deal with the fallout, Morneau said, without providing details of any plans or when the federal budget will be released.

He also would not reveal whether he expects the deficit to be bigger than previously projected, given the sharp decline in oil prices and the hit to financial markets on Monday, saying only that Ottawa is in a position to respond to such challenges.

READ MORE: COVID-19 stricken Grand Princess still scheduled to dock in Vancouver this April: port

The government is being urged to ease access to federal sick leave benefits, along with tax credits and other breaks, to help workers who can’t afford to stay home when sick, as well as to help small businesses that might not have the cash flow to manage the effects of the outbreak.

Canada reported its first death from COVID-19 on Monday. A man in his 80s died at a North Vancouver long-term care centre Sunday night, two to three days after first showing symptoms, British Columbia’s provincial health officer said.

The Canadian Press


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