Some advice for living in the computer age

Teach your children well to use computers as tools and not as a place the lose themselves in.

As I read over the letters to Santa from students in our area, I worry, as I’m sure generations before me did, what is going to happen to our children?

Computers, video games, cell phones… Lots of electronic devices that can entertain a youngster (and an adult) for hours at a time, without ever having to leave the house.

And I worry about the health of the next generation whose entertainment is mostly sedentary; and I also worry about how they will develop the sense of community that glues us together on this planet.

Computers were developed as a way to enhance communication and knowledge. And now they do everything that television does – and more.

Television was once touted as an education tool. Some people still defend it as such. But mainly it provides entertainment.

I would no more advocate getting rid of computers than I would television. Take away one addiction and people will find another to take its place.

I wonder what “they” did in the days before television. Perhaps they were addicted to reading. And before you can say “that’s not a bad thing”, it is if it causes the reader to ignore commitments, duties, family, etc.

If you are contemplating buying a computer or the similar electronic devices for your children, please teach them that “social” media like Facebook is no substitute for face to face contact with people. Connecting with people online is nothing like talking face to face, holding hands, enjoying activities together, etc.

These activities may eventually lead to volunteering for community events. Sitting for long hours at a computer forwarding jokes, uploading videos of your cat, or playing games will not.

Imagine your family gathering this Christmas: each one sitting in their separate home, connecting online. No dishes to wash, but no spontaneous conversation, no laughter, no heavenly smells in the kitchen.

Children look to adults for guidance and advice. Show them by example that sitting in front of a computer is not the way they want to spend the rest of their lives!

Wendy Coomber is the editor of the Ashcroft-Cache Creek Journal

Just Posted

Greyhound cleared to end routes in northern B.C., Vancouver Island

Company says nine routes have dropped 30% in ridership in last five years

Police seek witnesses after break-in at Cache Creek Subway

The break-in occurred in the early morning of Thursday, February 22.

Thompson, Chilcotin Steelhead Trout in danger of extinction

An emergency listing has been recommended to protect both species.

Community tax volunteers on hand to help prepare tax returns

Qualifying residents can have their returns prepared and filed for free.

RCMP continue investigation into missing Sun Peaks man

Ryan Shtuka disappeared after leaving the village of Sun Peaks on Feb. 17

President praises nearly 1,800 volunteers at B.C. Games

Ashley Wadhwani sits down with the Kamloops 2018 B.C. Winter Games President Niki Remesz

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

The way government learn someone has died is getting a digital overhaul

Governments in Canada turned to private consultants 2 years ago to offer blueprint

Bobsleigh team misses Olympic medal finish

Canadian team finishes four-man event 0.84 seconds behind first place, 0.31 seconds from podium

B.C. Games: Athletes talk Team Canada at PyeongChang 2018

From Andi Naudie to Evan McEachran there’s an Olympian for every athlete to look up to

Snowboarders sliding into fresh territory at B.C. Games

Athletes hit the slopes for first appearance as an event at the B.C. Winter Games in Kamloops

Cariboo woman raises funds for Seizure Investigation Unit beds at VGH

VGH Foundation gets VCH approval to begin fundraising for SIU beds; local efforts are paying off

Looking back at the 1979 B.C. Games: Good memories, even better jackets

39 years later, Kamloops is hosting the Winter Games again, with some volunteers returning

OLYMPICS 101: Oldest and youngest Canadians to reach the podium

This year, Canada sent its most athletes in Winter Games history, here’s a look at record breakers

Most Read